Can a crown/cap be placed on the molar without root canal treatment?

Sure can. Not all teeth need both. Most teeth that have had a root canal need a crown but not all. There are a lot more teeth that need crowns and not root canals though.
Yes. Not all crowned teeth need to have a root canal prior to crown placement. However, it is usually wise to place a crown on a molar tooth that has had a root canal to protect it from fracture.

Related Questions

What is crowning? Normally those that did root canal treatment did the crowning also. Does it permanently stick to teeth?

Tooth Covering. A crown, also referred to as a cap, is a covering that is placed over a tooth. Crowns are placed to protect a tooth from failure, such as breaking, or to replace parts of a missing tooth. A crown is permanently cemented to the tooth. If the crown falls off it can easily be recemented by a dentist. Read more...
Protective cover. A crown is a durable cap that veneers and gives strength to teeth that have been weakened by decay or fracture. It is permanently cemented to the tooth, but can still fail if not cared for. If you had a root canal by your general dentist, he or she will likely place a crown after. If an endodontist (specialist) did your root canal, you will be referred back to your general dentist for the crown. Read more...
Tooth Covering. A crown is a permanent covering that fits over an original tooth that is either decayed, damaged or cracked. Crowns are made of a variety of different materials such as porcelain, gold, acrylic resin or a mix of these materials. Porcelain generally has the most natural appearance, your dentist will decide which material is best to use. Read more...

Can you tell me how many x rays they take for root canal treatment of a lower molar?

Depends. Generally a preoperative x-ray (one straight on and one at an angle), if the dentist is using a root zx apical locator then a cone picture, if not then a file film and a cone picture with a final picture showing the canals filled and one of the build up. Even with all the x-rays these days the dose is so low standing outside or going to the airport security doses you more than the rct pictures. Read more...

Docs can you explain, is root canal treatment possible for half broken molar due to caries?

Usually. Many badly broken down teeth can be saved through a root canal (endodontic) procedure and a core/crown. Some teeth, however may be so structurally compromised that a good result is unlikely. You should see your dentist or endodontist to determine what is right for you. More info can be found at: http://www.Aae.Org (look under the "patients" section. Read more...
Yes. If the tooth does not have any other fracture and good to restore, then yes that's what is normally done in cases like this.. Read more...
Root Canal. If it is determined that by the dentist that the fracture and decay are not too extensive that the tooth cannot be restored, then by all means root canal away, and you won't lose the tooth in most cases that way. ;). Read more...

How toothache can cause sinusitis, with knowing the tooth with root canal treatment (upper right first molar)?

Tooth\sinus problems. Toothaches do not cause a sinusitis. If you have an infected upper tooth whose root is near the floor of the maxillary sinus, and it has an infection (whether or not it has had root canal therapy), the infection can spread to the sinus causing a sinusitis or sinus infection. A sinusitis or sinus infection can present as a toothache even if nothing is wrong with the tooth. Read more...
Complicated but yes. For an upper molar, the tooth roots are often very close or in the sinus separated by only a small amount of bone and membrane (like very thin skin). So a tooth with (or without) a root canal can develop an infection (full of bacteria) and invade the sinus. As the bacteria go untreated, a sinusitis (inflammation, congestion, some discomfort) can develop. Get the tooth fixed and go from there. Read more...
Not unusual. The roots of the upper first molar are often very close in proximity to the maxillary sinus. A sinus infection can cause a toothache, and a tooth infection can cause sinus pain. Or the two can occur independently. This tooth is the most common one for a root canal to fail due to its complexity. Seek evaluation by an endodontist, preferably one with 3-d imaging (cbct). Usually treatable. Read more...

Is a crown always required after root canal treatment?

No. A crown is not always required after a root canal. After a root canal, a tooth becomes more brittle and more likely to break. A crown helps prevent the tooth from breaking. If you decide not to get a crown placed on the tooth then you are taking a chance of losing that tooth although you spent the time and money doing the root canal. Take your dentist's advise. Read more...
Depends. If a molar or chewing tooth needs a root canal because of extensive decay or large filling then it should always be crowned. If any tooth that gets a root canal has sufficient supporting tooth structure a crown may not be needed. Your dentist will be able to determine what is best for any tooth that gets a root canal. Read more...
No. It is dependent upon how much tooth structure remains after removal of tooth decay and the root canal procedure. Molar or back teeth may require crown placement as chewing forces can cause repeated stress to the tooth structure resulting in fracture. If one or more walls of the tooth have been removed then a crown may be indicated. Consult your dentist for the optimum long term treatment options. Read more...
Most of the time. The root canal procedure removes the tooth's primary source of nutrition and moisture, the pulp. As a result posterior teeth generally require a crown in most cases to help reinforce the tooth. Sometimes a very conservative access hole can be made to treat front teeth, a crown may not be necessary. Read more...