Related Questions

How can I support my friend who has undergone chemotherapy for breast cancer?

Do support her. She may need your emotional support and other help. Go meet her and ask if you can help her with any probelms or issues of concern to her. She would appreciate your concern for her welfare and your offer to help her.Just the company of a good friend can be a big morale booster. Read more...

Please tell me what are other options besides chemotherapy for breast cancer?

Depends. Chemo is used when breast cancer has metastasized around the body, especially for tumors without hormone receptors (er/pr). It also is sometimes used to kill any microscopic cells that could grow in the future. Tumors that have er/pr may sometimes be treated with hormone therapy instead. Her2 positive tumors may often be treated with antibodies or pills that target her2 instead of or with chemo. Read more...
It depends. It depends on the type of breast cancer. If positive for estrogen and/or Progesterone receptors ("er" and "pr") there are other options, though in some cases it may not be as good as taking these meds in conjunction with chemo. If stage 4 breast cancer, there are many clinical trials. Again, it depends on the cancer stage, and the markers er/pr, and her2 from the cancer specimen. Read more...

I'm just wondering, if you opt out for chemotherapy for breast cancer what is the process you go through?

Not sure if 'opt. Out' means 'refuse' or 'decide to stop'. Either is a serious decision that requires discussion with 1 or more medical oncologists. The 'oncotype' process defines benefit and risk of chemo in some. However, depending on many factors (size, nodal status, receptors), the consequences vary. Perfect for second or third opinion. Read more...

Hormonal effects of chemotherapy for breast cancer?

Please clarify. It is unclear from your question what you are asking. Most breast cancers are estrogen-sensitive and can be treated with anti-estrogen medication (tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors). Many women who are peri menopausal when receiving traditional chemotherapy develop ovarian suppression from the chemo and effectively "go into" menopause. I hope this helps. Read more...

How long after you finished chemotherapy for breast cancer till your periods are regular?

Some times never. Younger age periods will come from 2 to 6 months most of the time in some never come back especially little older group will be menopausal at 40 , also ovum could be defective, congenital abnormalities is possible , must discuss with oncologist , for possible freezing of ovum before therapy and ivf in future. Read more...
Varies. It can take up to a year but I have seen it take longer. Hope this helps. Read more...

Are there any specific food to take and to avoid while in chemotherapy for breast cancer in stage 3. Age is 60 yrs and vegetarian.

Possibly. It depends on which drugs you are getting. Each drug has a slightly different effect on taste. In general you should maintain your nutrition. Plant based diet has been suggested to reduce the risk of recurrent disease. Read more...
Not really. If your cancer has the estrogen receptor, some oncologists advise avoiding soy, wild yam, red clover, and other phytoestrogens. There is conflicting evidence that these can cause breast cancer cells to grow more quickly. I advise patients not to add soy supplementation, but i think it's ok to continue eating soy if it's part of your baseline diet, especially if you're vegetarian. Read more...

Will Chemotherapy for breast cancer have any effect on functioning of a VP shunt?

Hydrocephalus . No. Chemotherapy does not have an affect on the functioning of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Infection and other medical problems can bring out the symptoms of hydrocephalus and it may appear that the shunt has malfunctioned but that is often not the case. Remain focused on beating the cancer and all the best to you. . Read more...

Can I take vitamin d while on chemotherapy for breast cancer?

Yes. There are no contraindications to vitamin d supplementation while on chemotherapy. There are vitamin d receptors found in breast tissue. Vitamin d has been shown to decrease the chance of developing certain benign and malignant types of breast cancer. However in the case of active breast cancer, while on chemotherapy, I do not believe there's any data showing benefits of vitamin d during chemo. Read more...
Yes. This vitamin does not effect chemotherapy. Do no take more than the recommended amount. Read more...
See my blog. I've written an article on this very topic, which can be found at mdprevent.Blogspot.Com while taking vitamin d is not expected to interfere with the chemotherapy, it probably will do little to help with the breast cancer prognosis. Read more...

How to boost white blood counts during chemotherapy for breast cancer?

"growth factors" Your oncologist can use bone marrow growth factors ("gcsf") to stimulate production of white blood cells. These drugs, developed and tested in the 1980's, became available in the ~spring of 1991 and (along with drugs to treat/prevent nausea) completely changed the field of oncology. It went from being a mostly inpatient discipline, to one almost entirely practiced in the outpatient setting. Read more...
Growth factors. There are medications to increase the white and red blood cell counts if they are affected by chemotherapy. Your oncologist can discuss them with you. There are specific guidelines for their use. Read more...
Growth factors. If your blood counts are severely low then use of growth factor injections(neulasta (pegfilgrastim) or neupogen) can help boost the recovery of your blood counts after chemotherapy. Read more...