What cause balance problem except acoustic neuroma?

Dizziness. There is a long list of ear related issues that cause balance problems, neurologic, cardiovascular, circulatory, metabolic/hormonal problems also can cause dizziness/lightheadedness/balance issues. Acoustic neuroma is a rare condition so lots of other things to check and consider first.
Many. Balance problem is a symptom and not a diagnosis and has many causes the main symptom with acoustic neuroma is deafness and tinnitus.

Related Questions

How to treat balance problems post radiation treatment for acoustic neuroma.

Your radiation. oncologist is the best source of information about which medications are worth a trial..MECLIZINE is the most commonly used but there are a number of newer drugs! Hope this helps! Dr. Read more...
Depends. It would depend on the size of the acoustic neuroma as well as the radiotherapy - need more details if you received one dose, were you on steroids, is this unilateral or bilateral etc. Your radiation oncologist should be able to help with this as well. Read more...

What sort of problem is an acoustic neuroma?

Brain tumor. An acoustic neuroma is an benign tumor of the auditory nerve, located in the auditory canal. They are relatively rare. Early symptoms include hearing loss, ringing in the ears, and vertigo. These tumors grow very slowly, and are treated with surgery or with radiation only if hearing is affected. Read more...
Acoustic neuroma. It is a benign tumor of the hearing and balance nerve. It can compress the nerve and cause hearing loss. Usually diagnosed by an MRI exam, it can now be treated non-surgically with a gamma knife. Read more...
Benign tumor. Acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that usually originates from the vestibular(balance) nerve. Treatment options include observation, surgery, or radiation depending on the symptoms, age of the patient, and growth of the lesion. See a neurotologist for full evaluation or a neurosurgeon that deals with these lesions on a regular basis. Read more...
Acoustic neuroma. An acoustic neuroma is a noncancerous growth that develops on the eighth cranial nerve. Also known as the vestibulocochlear nerve, it connects the inner ear with the brain and has two different parts. One part is involved in transmitting sound; the other helps send balance information from the inner ear to the brain. http://www.webmd.com/brain/acoustic-neuroma-causes-symptoms-treatments#2. Read more...

Could acoustic neuroma cause permanent hearing loss?

Yes. The majority cause unilateral or asymmetric hearing loss as the first and sometimes only symptom. This hearing loss is always permanent. Read more...
Yes. Acoustic neuroma grows on the auditory nerve deep in the auditory canal. Surgery to remove the tumor often will cause disruption of the nerve. The surgeon will do all he can to preserve hearing the best he can. Usually severe and permanent hearing loss is a result. Read more...

Are there causes for chronic unilateral tinnitus that are more likely and more benign than acoustic neuroma, or is an most likely?

Yes. My otolaryngological colleagues can add additional information re tinnitus, but, in my experience, an acoustic neuroma is a rare cause of tinnitus, and gradual degenerative hearing loss is far more often the cause of tinnitus. Read more...
Tinnitus . An is what we look for in patients with unilateral ear symptom but still not common to find anything wrong. Hearing loss the most common cause. Read more...

I'm worried about unilateral tinnitus. I know acoustic neuroma often causes this, but how common is acoustic neuroma among people w/unilat tinnitus?

Acoustic neuroma. Many less serious and benign conditions can cause unilateral tinnitus and hope yours is one of them. Unilateral tinnitus can be the presenting symptom of acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma). Recommend physical exam by a neurologist or ENT specialist, audiometric testing, and mri. Read more...
So common. Tinnitus is so common! can be unilateral, too. The vast majority of those with tinnitus do not have an acoustic neuroma. An MRI (high resolution cuts with contrast) can usually eliminate the possibility. Read more...

What kinds of things cause unilateral tinnitus (had this for years) and asymmetrical hearing loss? Causes other than acoustic neuroma?

Tinnitus and hearing. Hearing loss usually is associated with tinnitus. The loss can come from damage to the auditory nerve, or the hearing portion of the inner ear (both, which also as a vestibular component). There can be vascular damage, infection or hereditary causes. Sometimes trauma, or exposure to loud noises unilaterally can cause this. Read more...
Hearing loss. Genetics, infection, acoustic trauma, idiopathic. Acoustic neuroma is fairly uncommon though needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis. Read more...

Is an acoustic neuroma always the cause of high frequency hearing loss in one ear only with tinnitus, in 19yr old?

Acoustic neuroma. Usually is result of multiple ear infections as a child but you should see an ENT as soon as possible. Read more...
No. high frequency hearing loss may be secondary to noise, inefection, or inherited. Hearing loss in one ear should be evaluated by an ENT doctor to determine cause. Read more...

What is acoustic neuroma?

Balance nerve tumor. "acoustic neuroma" is actually a double misnomer: it is neither from the acoustic nerve nor is it a neuroma. It is actually a vestibular schwannoma: a benign tumor of the schwan cells (cells that wrap around and insulate nerves), not of the nerve itself, that grows off of / around the vestibular nerve, the nerve for balance, rather than the acoustic nerve or nerve of hearing. Read more...
Benign tumor . Acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor of the balance nerve. Treatments include observation, surgery, or radiation. Treatment is based in size of lesion, symptoms and age. Please see response to similar questions on this site. Read more...