8 doctors weighed in:
Does a necklace of magnets help headaches or a bracelet help arthritis?
8 doctors weighed in

Dr. Robert Kwok
Pediatrics
6 doctors agree
In brief: Not proven helpful
The magnetic therapy products available to consumers have not been proven to help arthritis.
Little magnets are sometimes sewn into bracelets or necklaces. The bracelets may be fashionable, but the magnets do not provide any additional benefits. However, pain is very subjective, so if a person believes he is doing more to treat his pain by wearing magnets, he may truly sense less pain.

In brief: Not proven helpful
The magnetic therapy products available to consumers have not been proven to help arthritis.
Little magnets are sometimes sewn into bracelets or necklaces. The bracelets may be fashionable, but the magnets do not provide any additional benefits. However, pain is very subjective, so if a person believes he is doing more to treat his pain by wearing magnets, he may truly sense less pain.
Dr. Robert Kwok
Dr. Robert Kwok
Thank
Dr. Mark Fisher
Neurology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Electromagnetism...
..was first recognized as a phenomenon in 1821 by Øersted.
It didn't take long for quacks to start peddling magnet therapy as a cure-all. The myth refuses to die. You're bathed in magnetic fields from the moment of conception: Earth's magnetic field & those of technology all around us. We're not affected. Do you think a few puny little magnets around your wrist or neck will have any effect?

In brief: Electromagnetism...
..was first recognized as a phenomenon in 1821 by Øersted.
It didn't take long for quacks to start peddling magnet therapy as a cure-all. The myth refuses to die. You're bathed in magnetic fields from the moment of conception: Earth's magnetic field & those of technology all around us. We're not affected. Do you think a few puny little magnets around your wrist or neck will have any effect?
Dr. Mark Fisher
Dr. Mark Fisher
Thank
Dr. Thomas Klein
Internal Medicine - Allergy & Immunology
In brief: No proof
Some will swear by magnets but there is no good proof in the medical literature.

In brief: No proof
Some will swear by magnets but there is no good proof in the medical literature.
Dr. Thomas Klein
Dr. Thomas Klein
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Andrea Brand
Board Certified, Family Medicine
6M people helped
Continue
107,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors