What is the most common anesthesia used during a wisdom teeth extraction procedure?

Talk to Dentist. Most teeth extractions can be done under local anesthesia with a cooperative patient. If there are especially impacted teeth then some sedation might be indicated. I don't even remember the procedure after a little dose of valium. If you have concerns please contact your dentist and discuss these fears with him. Good luck.
Lidocaine. Is probably the most commonly used dental anesthetic. Often a Marcaine block after the extraction will also be administered to keep you numb for a longer period of time to help deal with the immediate post op pain.
IV sedation. Iv sedation is very common and safe. The procedure goes very smooth and easy if under IV sedation.
Sedation. Approximately 80-90% of patients in my practice choose IV sedation or general anesthesia for this procedure. This is surgery, not dental fillings, so the experience is quite different.

Related Questions

I heard many negative things about versed anesthesia. Is it something to worry about during wisdom teeth extraction tomorrow? Or is it not that bad?

Generally safe. In a young healthy person having a low risk procedure, most anesthesia is very safe, with very low rates of complications. However, if you have questions, ask the surgeon before-hand! Read more...
Depends. Versed is an anxiolytic and often used to for procedures to help the patient feel more relaxed and less worried. It is often very well tolerated and patients are happy with the experience. You should not worry if it is given by someone trained in providing sedation. At higher doses, it can cause a myriad of problems such as respiratory depression, low blood pressure, allergic rxn, etc... Read more...
Not usually. safety relies upon the individual administering the drug. Read more...
Ask Dentist/OS. I would ask questions of the provider whom is going to administer the anesthesia and/or take out the teeth. Read more...
Safe and effective. Versed is typically used for sedation during procedures that require moderate conscious sedation. Conscious sedation procedures using intravenous versed is safe and effective. Read more...
Safe drug. I have used Versed since it was introduced in 1986. I also have had the pleasure of having it personally several times. Nothing to worry about! You will not be fully asleep as in general anesthesia, you will be what is referred to as conscious sedation. Read more...
Versed by itself. is very safe. It is given to young children in apple juice. It is very enjoyable most patients get a big smile on face afterwards. Read more...

How does anesthesia for wisdom teeth extraction usually work?

See Below. General anesthesia is a state in which the brain is put into a deep sleep and the pain centers are blocked. In addition, the dentist usually uses a local anesthetic in the area of surgery. Read more...
Light Sedation. Usually this operation can be done with local anesthesia and light sedation. Some dentists use valium , other might use a combination of medications including nitrous oxide. Read more...

Wisdom teeth extraction soon - should I be put under or just use local anesthesia?

Local. The best is to only use the local anesthetics to get the area fully numb. The sedation route can cause too many problems that are too complex. People elect sedation based on their fear that is artificially produced. Be smart and use only the local. Read more...
Anesthesia. Intravenous sedation is a very safe and effective form of anesthesia for the surgical removal of wisdom teeth. Of course, local anesthesia would be used as well. For many patients with anxiety about the procedure, intravenous sedation is clearly indicated and should be used. Your vital signs will be carefully monitored, you will likely have no memory of the procedure, and the risks are low. Read more...
Talk to Dentist. Most teeth extractions can be done under local anesthesia with a cooperative patient. If there are especially impacted teeth then some sedation might be indicated. I don't even remember the procedure after a little dose of valium. If you have concerns please contact your dentist and discuss these fears with him. General anesthesia should not be needed. Good luck. Read more...
Talk to Dentist. Local anesthesia and sedation are all that usually required. Read more...

Can you tell me about anesthesia for nursing mothers wisdom teeth extraction?

Pediatrician advice. Nursing moms can have wisdom teeth extracted with either local or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia will require to modifications. If you want general anesthesia, drugs will stay in your system for a number of hours. Best protocol is to pump and refrigerate enough milk for 24 hours. After that, you can resume breast feeding as normal. Read more...

Is it safe to use local anesthesia for wisdom teeth extraction?

Ansolutely. Personal preference. Some patients just insist on not being put under for the extractions, no matter how difficult the procedure might be. Read more...
Yes it is. Local anesthesia is used to remove teeth. Even with sedation, the teeth will still need to be numbed with local anesthesia. Read more...
Talk to Dentist. Most teeth extractions can be done under local anesthesia with a cooperative patient. If there are especially impacted teeth then some sedation might be indicated. It is rare that a full general anesthetic would be needed for dental extraction. If you have concerns please contact your dentist and discuss these fears with him. Good luck. Read more...
Yes. In almost every case, local anesthesia will be administered for the removal of wisdom teeth, unless there is some unusual circumstance that that prevents it from being used. Local anesthesia is very safe when administered correctly and in the correct dosage limits. Read more...

My son is going under general anesthesia for wisdom teeth extraction. He always gets horrible indigestion from anesthesia. Whats the best thing to give him? He wakes up immediately with dry heaves.

Nausea . Nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia is a common enough complication that it has its own abbreviation ("ponv: post operative nausea and vomiting"). Although most common in young women, nonsmokers, and people who get motion sickness, anyone can get this miserable problem after anesthesia. For most, it is a temporary and self-resolving problem. For some it can be severe enough to slow the process of going home and recovering. Unfortunately, people having wisdom tooth extraction often swallow some blood -- which can cause vomiting by itself. The choice of anesthetic is a complicated one which depends on many more variables than the liklihood of ponv. Provider experience, patient health status, length of procedure, and medication availability may all play into this decision. There are general anesthetic agents which are less likely to cause ponv than others, but these may not be the right choice for your son. The most important thing you can do is make sure that your son's provider knows that he has had nausea/vomiting after previous anesthetics, and discuss your concern and the provider's management plan in detail. This allows the provider to make appropriate management plans ahead of time. In addition to potentially altering the anesthetic, a provider may choose to administer antiemetic (anti-nausea) medication before the anesthetic has worn off -- or even before starting. Sometimes multiple medications are combined to try to prevent ponv. If ponv persists after going home, under-the-tongue tablets or suppositories can be used to treat the nausea. Be careful to follow the provider's instructions regarding restrictions on food and water before the procedure. Although ponv by itself is not life-threatening, undergoing general anesthesia with a full stomach can be life threatening and should not be undertaken except in an emergency. Read more...
PONV. Post operative nausea and vomiting (ponv) is a frequent ocurrence after surgery and anesthesia. You should get to know your anesthesia doctor and inform him or her that your son is prone to experience ponv. There are medications alone and in combination that are used by anesthesia doctors to help to prevent or ameliorate this condition. Read more...
Talk to MD. Your anesthesiologist should be able to treat this in a preventative manner before the operation. Discuss previous anesthetics and your concerns before the operation. Read more...

What kind of anethesia is used for wisdom teeth extraction?

Tooth extraction. Local anesthesia is usually sufficient. For more anxious persons, conscious sedation is available using nitrous oxide inhalation or IV sedatives (under medical supervision). Read more...
Local anesthesia . Your dentist or surgeon will discuss sedation options available for you, which may include oral, nitrous, intravenous, or a general anesthetic. You will still receive local anesthesia (injections in the mouth) with each of the sedation techniques. Read more...
Local anesthesia. The dentist use lidocain or bupivocain 0.5% with epinephrine for relaxing the paient we can give 1mg of Midazolam with or without nitouse oxide if you do not want to be awake we can adde small dose of propfol 20to 30 mg but we need complete monitor and o2. Read more...
IV sedation. Typically, all the wisdom teeth are removed at the same time, using IV sedation. An IV is placed and then medication is injected into the line. This allows the surgeon to titrate (control the amount and effect of) the medications much more accurately and safely, than if they were taken orally. Read more...
Varies. Local anesthesia (e.g. Lidocaine) is used for all extractions. Some surgeons will use IV medications such as valium, versed, propofol, etc. To induce a sedative state. Some may or may not also use nitrous oxide. Once you consult a dentist or oral surgeon, they will discuss the appropriate anesthesia for use in your particular case. Read more...
Talk to Dentist. Most teeth extractions can be done under local anesthesia with a cooperative patient. If there are especially impacted teeth then some sedation might be indicated. It is rare that a full general anesthetic would be needed for dental extraction. If you have concerns please contact your dentist and discuss these fears with him. Good luck. Read more...

Is wisdom teeth extraction really a low risk procedure? I'm extremely nurvous something will happen bad during my procedure tomorrow. I'm paranoid!

Wisdom tooth ext. Low risk compared to what? More risk than a simple filling, less risk than major surgery. Having said that, thousands of removal of wisdom teeth across the country every day for the last hundred years with very few complications when performed by competent surgeons. Discuss your fears and concerns with your own dentist prior to the procedure. Read more...