How long does it take to get a normal tooth cavity filling?

About an hour. It depends on the size and location of the filling to be done. Some take as little as 10-15 minutes, others about an hour. Ask your dentist how long he or she expects the apointment to take.

Related Questions

How long the anesthesia effect will last for tooth cavity filling?

2-3 hrs. Usually about that long but sometimes it is quicker or slower. Get your blood pumping and it will go away faster, go for a jog... Read more...
0-4 hours. Dpends if you "drilless" dentistry, you won't be numb, short acting anesthesia can wear off as quickly as 40 min, long acting can go 4 even 6 hrs. Read more...
Varies. Some local anesthetics wear off within 30 minutes, while other are specifically designed to be active for up to 20 hours. It depends on the type and location of the drug. Talk to your anesthesiologist or dentist about medications that they will use. Read more...

Sealing preexisting fillings to prevent new cavities all the cavities I get are not new but underneath my old fillings. Is there a way to use a sealant around the outside edges where a cavity meets the tooth to stop this?

I . I believe you are asking if sealing a filling will help if a new cavity has formed underneath an old filling. If there is new decay, usually the old filling will need to be removed so that the underlying decay can be treated. Read more...
That depends. Sealants can not be used around silver amalgam fillings. Sealants can not be used if there is already decay under or around an existing filling. If an exisiting composite filling has a small defect on a margin it can sometimes be repaired with sealant before any new decay developes. Read more...
No. Recurrent decay (cavities under fillings) is caused by leakage betewwn the tooth and filling material. It is also caused by improper hygiene practices. Recurrent decay must be dealt with by removing the existing failing filling and affected tooth structure. The dentist then restores the tooth with a new filing or crown. The decay must be cleaned out completely before the new filling is placed. Read more...

What can I do to keep from having to get a new filling in the same tooth every year? For the most part I have good dental hygiene, and rarely get cavities. But I do have one molar on the lower right side of my mouth that seems to have a new or expanded ca

Without . Without an exam and a radiograph, it is tough to tell how large that restoration is. Molars take the brunt of your biting force, and it may very well be that the tooth needs a stronger restoration to help protect it and absorb those biting forces. It is possible that the tooth would benefit from an onlay or a full coverage crown. Yes, those restorations will be more expensive than the filling, but will also last much longer. It could also be that you have a "plunger cusp" in the opposite arch that exerts excessive force on one small area of that restoration, causing it to crack often. Smoothing that point down goes a long way in minimizing the trauma on that filling. Read more...
There . There is an issue with a restoration if it has to be replaced every year. I would recommend a crown. Once cemented it is done, the tooth is sealed and it is the strongest restoration for a tooth when a filling is not "working". Read more...
A . A restoration that requires replacement every year is unusual. There is probably something that is not being accounted for that is causing early failure of the restoration. Some conditions that might lead to early failure are: 1. Shrinkage of the filling material allowing decay causing bacteria to get between the filling and the tooth with resultant decay. 2. The filling is simply too large for the tooth and the tooth structure is weakened allowing flexing of the tooth and then breaking of the bond between the tooth and the filling leading to decay. 3. An unseen crack in the tooth which allows flexing of the tooth and again leading to decay. 4. Mechanical stresses on the tooth, such as the plunging cusp mentioned in another answer, that are greater than the filling material and tooth can withstand leading to failure. 5. Simple inability to adequately clean between the teeth leading to decay. This may be an indication for orthodontic treatment to relieve the crowding or malalignment of the teeth. Crowding and malalignment of the teeth can make it almost impossible in some cases to adequately clean some teeth. Or, it may be that a filling is the wrong choice for restoring the tooth and a restoration that strengthens the tooth, such as an onlay or crown, will be required. So, ... Ask your dentist why the restoration is failing. Is it because the filling is too big, the tooth is too weak, the opposing teeth are putting too much pressure on the restoration, is there a crack in the tooth or is there a malalignment or crowding issue preventing adequate cleaning of the tooth. The answer given will dictate the best restorative solution to the failing restoration or at least be a start to the solution if orthodontics is required. Read more...
When . When we elect to help a patient out by filling a tooth, we choose a material which in our clinical opinion is going to last for a reasonable amount of time, at least five years. So all things being equal, i would be surprised if a tooth broke again in such a short time. Why don't you ask your dentist to fix the tooth properly. He is going to need to take an x-ray and make sure he understands the problem. This might involve a slightly more extensive restoration like a gold or porcelain onlay or crown. Best wishes dr. Neil mcleod dds dentistry that lasts - quality that counts. Read more...

I'm embarrass to go to the dentist because I have two big cavities in front on my teeth what will the dr do can I get a filling?

No need to be. Embarrassed. The dentist is there to help you in this situation. Ask your friends for a recommendation of a dentist that they like. There are many options for restoring decayed front teeth depending on how big the cavities are. Which is best for your situation can only be determined with a full dental exam. The sooner you get started the sooner they can fix it for you. Please don't wait. Read more...
Don't be. Having the two cavities in your front teeth may be only part of your problems. Your dental health can affect your general health. Just take the time to see a dentist who can examine your mouth and determine how to get you back on track. They can easily restore your teeth back to good shape so that they look good and are strong to enjoy eating. You will be smiling before you know it. Good luck. Read more...
Get to the dentist. Would you be more embarrassed if you ended up losing the teeth? The dentist and staff have dealt with this for years, and know how to comfort patients in need. Read more...
Dentists luv 2 help. Dentists love to help people and especially enjoy rehabilitating a person's smile. Don't be embarrassed, be excited that there are trained professionals who will help restore your smile! after a complete examination and possibly x-rays, your dentist will discuss what solutions are best for you! so go out asap and so you can start smiling again! Read more...
Stop and Think. What is more embarrassing? Showing the dentist your situation, or keep showing your friends your bad smile situation. Remember that the dentist can help your appearance in front of your friends - so get the treatment to not be embarrassed in front of your friends that you see daily. Read more...

Can tooth cavities and the fillings cause permanent damage to your tooth?

It all wrecks things. Tooth decay will damage teeth as they eat away at the structure. Our jobs as dentists is to minimize the damage we cause when we fix the problem. So...The combination of decay and corrective measures does damage a tooth. The hope is to minimize the damage and hope that it stays like that. Read more...
Yes. Decay causes permanent damage as well as the tooth structure that is removed in removing the decay. I have seen a reduction in the number of teeth that crack or split when white composite fillings are used instead of the mercury containing silver metal fillings. Metal expands when eating hot food or drinking hot beverages. Read more...
Yes. Dental decay eats away and permanently damages tooth structure making the teeth weaker. The bigger the cavity, the weaker the tooth. Fillings repair the damage but are still not as strong as the original tooth structure. Fillings (or crowns) are necessary to repair the damage. The strongest teeth are the ones that have never had cavities or fillings. Watch what you eat & keep your teeth clean. Read more...

Is there such thing as a clear filling instead of silver for a tooth cavity?

Yes. There are composite resin materials that are tooth colored that can be used instead of the old silver amalgam fillings. Read more...
No. There are no clear fillings, but there are tooth-colored filling materials that very closely resemble the color of a normal healthy tooth. These are generally used today instead of silver amalgam, particularly in esthetic areas such as the front teeth. Read more...
Tooth colored. Tooth colored fillings (composite resins) are available instead of silver fillings.Many shades are available. Read more...

I have 6 cavities and a tooth that is broken in half. What are the dangers of not pulling the broken tooth and not filling the cavities?

Decayed teeth. If you don't get the cavities taken care of, soon the nerve of those teeth will be involved causing pain and infection and then you will need more complicated treatment. Same with broken tooth. If not taken care of, it will rot further and can cause abscess and infection. The infection can also spread in your body and heart. So the best is to see a dentist. Your health starts in your mouth. Read more...
Infection!! Not removing the tooth broken in half will lead to infection, not fixing the decayed teeth will lead to more fractured teeth, which will lead to more infection. Any questions! get to your dentist and let them fix your problems. Read more...
Not getting. Dental care and taking care of cavities and broken teeth will lead to: 1. Pain 2. Infections 3. Loss of teeth 4. Digestive problems 5. An ugly smile 6. Collapse of bite 7. Loss of self esteem 8. Despair for not getting treatment ** plus see comment below:. Read more...

Can tooth cavities and the fillings cause permanent damage to your teeth?

In this way... Once your teeth are decayed and require fillings, they are not quite as strong and healthy as what we call "virgin" teeth. Nothing is as good as what nature gives you with healthy teeth. So, yes you can say they have been permanently damaged. Practice good oral hygiene, eat healthy, and see your dentist to prevent cavities, or treat them early if "damaged" by decay. Read more...
Yes. Cavities left untreated can cause permanent damage to teeth to the extent of needed them removed. On the other hand if they are treated with fillings or other restorations like inlays or crowns cavities can and should be eliminated from the teeth with minor damage. Read more...
Yes. Cavities have destroyed part of the tooth by definition. Fixing the cavity removes the bad part of the tooth and a little more to ensure you are touching "good" tooth. So you have a hole in the natural tooth that is filled or restored with different materials depending on how big the cavity was. Read more...

What can I do to treat tooth pain after getting composite filling into cavities?

Contact your dentist. Some sensitivity is normal after any restoration. Usually 2-3 days of decreasing sensitivity. Tylenol, (acetaminophen) aspirin, or Ibuprofen can be used for mild to moderate discomfort. But if the intensity of pain is more severe, you must contact your dentist and make arrangements to have it checked. Read more...
OTC pain meds. You should not have pain after composite fillings. Typically the pain is from the injection sites which goes away after a few days. In the meantime any otc pain medicine like Motrin should help. If you are having pain in the tooth it could mean the filling was really close to the nerve and a root canal may be needed, or the bite may be too high and needs to be adjusted. Read more...
Need to see Dentist. Please see the dentist who filled the tooth asap... One possibility is that the filling is high. A slight adjustment may resolve it completely. Or... The filling may be very close to the nerve. This can lead to a root canal or loss of your tooth. Aleve, (naproxen) advil, Motrin or for more holistic patients, arnica can be helpful to reduce swelling and pain temporarily. Read more...
Time frame. Newly placed composites in teeth can cause the teeth to be sore for awhile. If the pain persists, then I would get back to the dentist. If the filling was deep, and near the nerve, there could be a potential nerve involvement. Also, if the filling is high in bite (you are hitting the area first before the other teeth,) the filling may need to be adjusted. Read more...
Depends. depends on the pain but it is common to have some sensitivity done after "most" fillings independent on what material or techniques was used. For slight to mild pain I would just use ibuprofen etc to handle any inflammation/pain. for moderate to severe I would still take the ibu but at max dose (800mg every 6hrs) and schedule with the DR that did the work asap....It could be simple bite issues. Read more...