4 doctors weighed in:
When can I play football again after treatment for hand dislocation?
4 doctors weighed in

Dr. Mark Deitch
Surgery - Hand Surgery
2 doctors agree
In brief: Depends on the joint
"hand dislocation" is not specific enough to give you a definitive answer. The most common dislocation is of the middle joint of the finger. If it is a dislocation with no fracture and is stable after it is put back in place, then you can often resume sports with the injured finger "buddy" taped to the adjacent finger. If you have a more severe injury, it may take longer to return to sports.

In brief: Depends on the joint
"hand dislocation" is not specific enough to give you a definitive answer. The most common dislocation is of the middle joint of the finger. If it is a dislocation with no fracture and is stable after it is put back in place, then you can often resume sports with the injured finger "buddy" taped to the adjacent finger. If you have a more severe injury, it may take longer to return to sports.
Dr. Mark Deitch
Dr. Mark Deitch
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Dr. Jeffrey Wint
Surgery - Hand Surgery
In brief: Finger dislocations
can be mild or severe depending upon the extent of the soft tissue injury, rather than give a time frame its best too say once the swelling goes down and motion returns, Splinting to avoid injury with a finger guard or tube may be needed as well depending on the finger and the specific sport.

In brief: Finger dislocations
can be mild or severe depending upon the extent of the soft tissue injury, rather than give a time frame its best too say once the swelling goes down and motion returns, Splinting to avoid injury with a finger guard or tube may be needed as well depending on the finger and the specific sport.
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
Dr. Jeffrey Wint
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Dr. Raymond Raven
Surgery - Hand Surgery
In brief: Depends
Dislocated fingers are usually stable once put back in place (reduced).
Simple buddy taping can allow early return to play. More complicated injuries such as fractures or tendon injuries, must be treated by strict immobilization for a certain period of time and some require surgery. If you've injured your hand and want to return to play safely, see a hand surgeon for a complete evaluation.

In brief: Depends
Dislocated fingers are usually stable once put back in place (reduced).
Simple buddy taping can allow early return to play. More complicated injuries such as fractures or tendon injuries, must be treated by strict immobilization for a certain period of time and some require surgery. If you've injured your hand and want to return to play safely, see a hand surgeon for a complete evaluation.
Dr. Raymond Raven
Dr. Raymond Raven
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