How long after having carpal tunnel release surgery will I be able to type?

Depends on surgery. This can depend on the surgery (an open procedure or a minimally invasive endoscopic procedure). I perform a specific type of endoscopic procedure and patients can type as early as the same day but usually wait until the next day. I have had staff start work as early as 2 days after having bilateral carpal tunnel releases. With the open procedure you may have to wait several more days / wks.
3 weeks. Usually about 3 weeks after surgery.
In hours. Many of my patients go back to typing the next day after carpal tunnel surgery and do better because they have better sensation in their fingers. No splinting is necessary and finger movement is encouraged after surgery.
A few weeks. Most of the pts I have seen, recover really fully within 2 or 3 weeks, but some may take up to 4-6 weeks if the nerve was electrically severely impaired. Work closely with your surgeon. Outcomes are usually fabulous.

Related Questions

What exactly is carpal tunnel release surgery? |

Details follow. Carpal tunnel release surgery involves making an incision in the palm and using the incision (either using an endoscope or a microscope) to cut the over-grown ligament (transverse ligament) that runs across the wrist and is compressing the median nerve. With this surgery 80+% of people have substantial improvement of their symptoms. Read more...
Carpal ligament. The carpal ligament is cut. This allows more room for the contents of the wrist. These include the tendons, tendon sheaths and the median nerve. Read more...
Ligament release. The transverse carpal ligament is the superior border of the carpal tunnel. The median nerve runs within the carpal tunnel and when compressed, causes the symptoms associated with carpal tunnel syndrome (cts). In order to relive the pressure on the median nerve, the transverse carpal ligament must be released. This is accomplished with either open or endoscopic techniques. Read more...
SUCCESS MEANS? Usually the ligament is released and the nerve pressure goes down, ie the nerve gets decompressed. http://www.handsurgerypodcast.com/endscopic-carpal-tunnel-video.html. Read more...
CTR. A carpal tunnel release divides the transverse carpal ligament which forms the roof of the carpal tunnel. By dividing the TCL, the median nerve is decompressed and alleviates the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome. Read more...

How effective is carpal tunnel release surgery?

Very. But 1st make sure u have the correct diagnosis- by a neurologist. Other non surgical tx have been exhausted and no other reversible cause like hypothyroid. Read more...
Very. It is one of the most effective procedures we do in orthopaedics. Patients with night-time symptoms and pain do the best. Those a with muscle atrophy and constant numbness and tingling, can expect improvement over time. See a board certified orthopaedic hand surgeon for evaluation and treatment. Current mini-open and endoscopic procedures are well tolerated. Read more...
Very high. The success rate of a carpal tunnel release is very high. Assuming a proper work-up and failed conservative therapy, you should do well. Good luck. Read more...

Is pain normal after carpal tunnel release surgery?

Yes. It is normal to have pain at the site of the incision after carpal tunnel surgery for up to two weeks. After that it should be ivestegated. If your surgeon is not interested in helping you you should seek a second opinion soon. Read more...
Some. While typically everyone in surgery gets a prescription for pain medicine, most state that they did not need it or used it minimally. Many get by with tylenol, (acetaminophen) advil, alleve or a similar over the counter medication. Others feel the need to take pain medication for a few days everyone will not respond to surgery the same http://www.Handctr.Com/carpal-tunnel-syndrome-q-a.Html. Read more...
Yes. It takes some time to heal after surgery. Take it easy and you should heal up soon. Read more...

Can you tell me about carpal tunnel release surgery?

Two types. Traditional open cts releae involves freeing up the median nerve by cutting the transverse carpal ligiment. The incision is in the base of the hand and takes a couple of weeks to heal. Endoscopic release gives you a smaller incision in the wrist and heals in a couplle of days. More expensive and more likely to require a second operation. Read more...
Carpal tunnel . A carpal tunnel release is a very effective procedure for patients that have failed conservative care. It is an outpatient procedure. A small incision is made in the proximal palm of the hand and the transverse carpal ligament is divided to decompress the median nerve. Read more...

What is the new method of carpal tunnel release surgery?

Endoscopic. While it is not new (been around for 20 years), a small incision is made and the surgery is done through a "micro" incision. Read more...
Many choices. There are a variety of ways to release a carpal tunnel: traditional open, endoscopic, limited open, and a new system called manos. No method has been proven to be superior to the others after the initial surgical recovery time. Best to speak to your surgeon about which method they use and why. Read more...
Mini-open. Endoscopic and mini-open incision techniques can be used to complete carpal tunnel surgery. Endoscopic surgery is commonly confused with "laser" surgery, though no such technique exists. Both approaches involve very small incisions, typically 1-2 cm in length. Read more...
Endoscopic. please watch my video on youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyEVwBXHAL0. Read more...

What is it like to have a carpal tunnel release surgery?

Relatively simple. Most patient experience significant improvement of numbness and tingling with elimination of pain. The surgery is short and takes only a few minutes and there is little to no pain postoperatively. Down time is approximately 1 week. Read more...
Here are some videos. www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4hty1vyrxg. Real footage: surgery video of endoscopic carpal tunnel release using the agee proximal http://www.Handsurgerypodcast.Com/endoscopic-carpal-tunnel.Html http://www.Handsurgerypodcast.Com/endscopic-carpal-tunnel-video.Html. Read more...

Need data on the effectiveness of carpal tunnel release surgery?

Very effective. Carpal tunnel syndrome is a very effective treatment for people with carpal tunnel syndrome (cts). Failures are usually do to incorrect diagnosis, such as cervical radiculopathy or diabetes, or incomplete surgical release of the transverse carpal ligament. When the right surgery is done for the right reason, the results are excellent. Try the hand society web site assh.Org for more details. Read more...
77% good results. Dr Coats is absolutely right that when the right operation is done in the right patient the results are usually excellent but that is not real life. We surveyed 6263 patients after routine carpal tunnel decompression in the UK - all cases, not those selected by a specialist with an interest in CTS - and 77% reported themselves either completely cured or greatly improved. 7% were worse! Read more...

What is the success rate of having a carpal tunnel release surgery?

CTR. Depends how severe the median nerve is compressed prior to the surgery. Check that with emgncs. The more severe the cts, the more residual numbness and tingling will remain. Generally, a great procedure to lessen pain, numbness, and tingling. Read more...
SUCCESS MEANS? It all depends on how you define success. It isnearly 100% succecful in taht usually the ligament is released and the nerve pressure goes down, ie the nerve gets decompressed. Is it successful in returning sensation and strength to normal ...That s where expectations, and pre-op assessment and how severe it started from. Read more...
Very high. The success rate of a carpal tunnel release is very high. Assuming a proper work-up and failed conservative therapy, you should do well. Good luck. Read more...