Will I be able to run after a foot amputation?

Yes. It depends on your strength and conditioning and the level of amputation. Most people can perform all daily activities and enjoy a regular excercize routine.
Possible. There are prosthetic devices available for runners of all levels. It is recommended that patients get used to a walking prosthesis before obtaining a running leg. If the ankle/heel are still present there are devices that can be used to "extend" the foot and provide some of the bounce necessary for running.
Possibly. If you were able to run before the surgery, after a period of rehabilitation you may be able to return to running following the surgery.
Possibly. Younger/ healthier patients are able to do almost everything after an amputation, including running. The higher the level of the amputation, the more work on the heart to exercise, and the more difficult to learn to walk. Most people can learn to walk after a below knee amputation. Many amputees play sports, including skiing, running, etc.

Related Questions

Can a person drive a car after a foot amputation?

Yes. There are cars which are outfitted for handicapped people which allows even amputees to drive. Read more...
Yes. The ability to drive a car in a normal configuration can be done as long as there is a part of the foot that can reliably be used to work the peddles. In the event that this is not the case then the car can be configured for hand controls. Read more...
Eventually yes... Initially it is not recommended as you will probably have a bulky bandage and you will be using a surgical shoe or boot of some sort. You will need to plan to have someone drive you around until your doctor feels that it is safe for you to drive on your own. Read more...

Is it normal to be depressed after a foot amputation?

Yes. It is not uncommon for depression following any removal of part of your body such as a leg, foot, breast, or arm. Talk with your doctor about support groups in your area and medications that can help. Read more...
AMPUTATION SUPPORT. I know some hospitals sponsor "Amputation Support Groups", where patients can talk to each other about their feelings regarding their amputation. Sometimes a psychiatrist or psychologist is involved. You should also mention this to your primary physician. Read more...

How much blood will I lose during foot amputation?

Not much. It should not be enough to require a transfusion unless you are anemic beforehand. Your surgeon will use a tourniquet during surgery if he is concerned about blood loss. Many times an amputation is required because there isn't enough blood to a limb, in which case blood loss should be minor. Read more...
Depends . It all depends on the level of the amputation and what the surgeon decides to do with the main arteries of your feet. I usually hand tie the arteries to prevent a lot of bleeding. But the arteries could be too small. Major foot amp, trans met amp, which half of the foot is amputated, is the amputation with highest bleeding rate. I would estimate 50-75ml of actual blood loss. Read more...
It depends. It depends on the quality of your circulation and on the procedure performed. Read more...

How can I avoid a foot amputation if I am diabetic?

Diabetic Foot Care. The best way to avoid diabetic foot ulcers is to keep your blood glucose under control. Also, your pcp should perform a diabetic foot exam using a monofilament to check your foot sensation. You may also want to have diabetic foot care performed by a podiatrist. Read more...
Control the diabetes. Hopefully your diabetes has been well controlled enough that it hasn't affected the circulation in your legs. Once the circulation is compromised, you run the risk of poor healing infections. Once the infections start, its an uphill battle to control them, at times requiring amputations. Read more...
Professional care. Diabetic foot ulcers and infection may often times be prevented with good diabetic foot education and foot care by a professional, tight sugar control, good nutrition, frequent foot inspection and use of properly fitting shoes. Read more...
Good Foot care. The best a diabetic can do is take good care of their feet. Always wear socks and shoes. Make sure the toe area is wide so the shoes do not pinch any part of the foot. Always check inside of shoes before wearing them, a pebble can cause problems for diabetics. Check the feet everyday especially the soles for small open areas that need to be tended. Use a moisturizer. Read more...
Check circulation. Absolutely agree with medical treatment of diabetes being first and foremost in prevention of major amputations. One other thing to keep in mind is the high prevalence of vascular disease amongst diabetics. Consult with a vascular surgeon who can check your ankle-brachial index or toe pressures to figure out if you have significant arterial occlusive disease and to intervene when necessary. Read more...