Why is cigarette smoking a risk factor of coronary artery disease?

Smoking Vascular Dz. Smoking accelerates the development of atherosclerosis (plaque formation / cholesterol build-up / formation of blockages) in blood vessels. The exact mechanism is not understood. Studies show that high cholesterol, high blood pressure and cigarette smoking together increase the risk seven times. If you smoke several packs/day for several years, this increases your risk two fold.
Arterial damage. It causes damage to to the lining of artery hence starts formation of plaque or blocakage.

Related Questions

How effective is smoking cessation for treating coronary artery disease (CAD)?

Coronary artery dise. Smoking is extremely effective at making CAD worse. Stopping smoking helps keep it from getting worse in concert with other treatments. Read more...

I smoke have chest pains been evaluated by doctors what is the likelihood that I have coronary artery disease? Trying to quit smoking any suggestions?

You're young. At your age, the risk of CAD is still very low - even though you smoke. Do you have diabetes, hypertension, family history of premature heart attacks or early death? Those would all raise your risk. Assuming average values: cholesterol 200, HDL 40, no hypertension or diabetes, your risk of CAD is 0.3% per year for the next 10 years. Please stop smoking. Only you can do it. Read more...
Determination. Your chances of having significant coronary disease at 25 is minimal. Smoking is by choice, as is stopping. The first and most successful step is to decide to stop. Everything else is window dressing. Don't buy them, you won't smoke them. Read more...

Do I have any risk factors of coronary artery disease? 59, female, BMI 28, sedentary?

Low risk. Your sendintary lifestyle is a risk. However, the most common and serious risk factors are smoking, diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, genetics, age, and obesity. Read more...
Need Information. Both labs and risk factors are important in knowing cardiovascular (cvd) risk. More than cholesterol, cvd is related to the number of LDL (ldl-p) and HDL particles (hdl-p). Because cholesterol in LDL and HDL particles is highly variable cholesterol levels often disagree with particle number. When cholesterol and particle number disagree cvd risk tracks with ldl-p and hdl-p, not ldl-c or hdl-c. Read more...

What are risk factors for coronary artery disease?

Several. There several risk factors (CRF) for coronary artery disease, some modifiable and some not. Non-modifiable crfs include family history (genetics), sex and age. Some modifiable crfs which can be treated with medications or lifestyle changes include smoking, hypertension, diabetes and cholesterol status, particularly LDL or "bad" cholesterol. Read more...
There are many. There are many risk factors - from gender (men are at higher risk when they are younger, but this changes with age) to other diseases (obesity and diabetes) to cholesterol levels to activity to smoking - and beyond. The best thing to do is to talk to your doctor about your health - what matters to one person may not matter to you! Read more...

What are the risk factors for getting coronary artery disease?

SEVERAL. Age weight diabetes hypertension smoking sedentary lifestyle obesity genetics. Read more...
Multiple StartsAge 7. Since starts in childhood, complications become more apparent with age, men progress faster then women, lipoproteins (not cholesterol), blood glucose above optimal (hba1c ?5.0%), increased bp, eg. Typical resting systolic not below 120, smoking, obesity, stress (especially chronic internalized anger), eating low fat foods, genetics, sedentary. Study taubes, attia, lustig, dietdoctor, big fat lies. Read more...

What are some of the risk factors associated with coronary artery disease?

5 major. There are 5 major risk factors for coronary artery disease. They include diabetes, hypertension, elevated cholesterol, cigarettes, and family history of coronary artery disease. Read more...
There are several. There are several risk factors for cad. These include family history (father, mother, siblings, grandparents). History of smoking. History of diabetes. High blood pressure, eleveated cholesterol, poor diet, lack of exercise, and obesity. These are some of the more common ones. Genetics and smoking are probably the most important. Read more...