Bacterial infection from endoscopy?

Highly unlikely. Unless there was penetration of the tube being endoscoped (colon, stomach, small bowel, other) it would be remarkably unusual to acquire infection from these devices.

Related Questions

Can I catch a bacterial infection from an endoscopy?

Doubtful. These are always sterilized before using. Unless there was penetration of the tube being endoscoped (colon, stomach, small bowel, other) it would be remarkably unusual to acquire infection from these devices. Read more...

What can I do to prevent bacterial infections?

Good hygiene. The best way to prevent bacterial infections, or viral infections, is good hygiene. Wash your hand properly and often. Next come nutrition; your immune system works much better if you give it the proper tools to work with. Next comes sleep; not sleeping properly or enough has been shown to weaken the immune system and increase susceptibility to infections. Read more...

Can I get a bacterial infection by kissing someone?

Sometimes yes. Depending on where one kisses upon another person's body, he will bring some bacteria into his mouth, which means onto his throat and down into his tummy. If his mouth gets strep throat bacteria from kissing, then he can develop a strep throat infection. If his mouth gets h.Pylori bacteria from kissing, then he can get an h.Pylori stomach ulcer. Many other bacteria can also be gotten from kissing. Read more...
Kissing. I agree with dr. Kwok's note to you but wanted also to add now that syphilis is spreading in the heterosexual population like it has been spreading in the homosexual community. Syphilis if caught in the mouth through oral sexual contact can also be spread to others with saliva. Now most people will not have this infection, but if there is anything odd in your illness this test can also be done. Read more...

Does green mucous mean that I have a bacterial infection?

Not necessarily. The color of the mucous is dependent on the cells involved in the inflammatory process, not necessarily infection, and the chemicals/products they contain on bursting. We rely on more symptoms and risks for treatment to avoid resistance. If you have risk factors and fever and change in the intensity of symptoms, we are more likely to treat with antibiotics. Read more...
Color of mucous. The color of your mucous really has not relation to the presence of a bacterial infection, as opposed to a viral infection or even a non-infectious issue. The presence or absence of other symptoms would be more telling - fever, chills, sweats, headache, facial pains, earache, weakness, achy. Read more...

Is the bacterial infection I have behind my lightheadedness?

Not enough informati. The phrase bacterial infection is too vague for anyone to answer. You will need to be more specific about the infection you have. Read more...

How can I tell the difference between a viral versus a bacterial infection?

Often timing or test. There are many different types of viral infections and bacterial infections so it depends on location. by type of infection: sore throat: bacteria can easily be identified with an office test. if negative usually viral sinusitis: after a cold is going on for 7+ days and getting better, suddenly gets worse pneumonia: doctor exam, x-ray, culture flu (viral): type of symptoms, office test. Read more...
It can be tough. Doctors often have a hard time telling the same thing. Generally, viral illnesses may produce a low fever, clear colored mucus, generalized fatigue, muscle aches, joint pains and are treated with supportive care and symptomatic relief. There are anti-viral meds for some cases. Bacterial infections may be harsher with higher fever, colored mucus, worsening symptoms, etc. See Doc if concerned. Read more...
No simple answer. There are hundreds of known bacterial and viral diseases. Some viral illnesses are mild, others severe. The same for bacterial infections. If you have a specific condition or illness in mind let us know so we can give you some guidance. Read more...