18 doctors weighed in:

What does the start of a diabetic foot ulcers actually look like?

18 doctors weighed in
Dr. Susan Wingo
Internal Medicine - Endocrinology
10 doctors agree

In brief: It depends.

Foot ulcers do not usually happen spontaneously.
They usually begin at the site of an injury. Avoiding poor-fitting footwear that causes reddening of the skin, or blisters; closely monitoring minor injuries, and seeking prompt care for major injuries or minor ones that do not improve quickly can help prevent ulcers from forming.

In brief: It depends.

Foot ulcers do not usually happen spontaneously.
They usually begin at the site of an injury. Avoiding poor-fitting footwear that causes reddening of the skin, or blisters; closely monitoring minor injuries, and seeking prompt care for major injuries or minor ones that do not improve quickly can help prevent ulcers from forming.
Dr. Susan Wingo
Dr. Susan Wingo
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Dr. Payam Rafat
Podiatry
2 doctors agree

In brief: The start can vary

A diabetic foot ulcer is best diagnosed with a physical exam. Your physician will ask you to remove your shoes in order to inspect your feet.
They will look for redness, calluses, bruising, blistering, swelling, and for open sores. Sometimes the ulcer may be hidden and will be discovered following the debridement of calluses or the deroofing of blisters.

In brief: The start can vary

A diabetic foot ulcer is best diagnosed with a physical exam. Your physician will ask you to remove your shoes in order to inspect your feet.
They will look for redness, calluses, bruising, blistering, swelling, and for open sores. Sometimes the ulcer may be hidden and will be discovered following the debridement of calluses or the deroofing of blisters.
Dr. Payam Rafat
Dr. Payam Rafat
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Dr. Khurram Khan
Wound care
2 doctors agree

In brief: Get checked

A break in the skin which looks like a sore.
It may have associated swelling, redness and odor with drainage. If you suspect an ulcer please see a doctor immediately.

In brief: Get checked

A break in the skin which looks like a sore.
It may have associated swelling, redness and odor with drainage. If you suspect an ulcer please see a doctor immediately.
Dr. Khurram Khan
Dr. Khurram Khan
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Dr. Adam Ringler
Podiatry
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Diabetic ulcer

Diabetic ulcers usually are nonpainful do to lack of sensation (neuropathy) in the feet.
An area in which there is redness may indicate increased pressure and can be a sign that an ulcer is developing.

In brief: Diabetic ulcer

Diabetic ulcers usually are nonpainful do to lack of sensation (neuropathy) in the feet.
An area in which there is redness may indicate increased pressure and can be a sign that an ulcer is developing.
Dr. Adam Ringler
Dr. Adam Ringler
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Dr. Susan Wingo
Internal Medicine - Endocrinology

In brief: Check feet daily!

Also, because many people with diabetes have neuropathy, or poor nerve function, they cannot always tell when there is a scratch or scrape or even a blister on their feet.
For this reason, they should visually inspect their feet every day. One way to do this is to keep a mirror under the bed, and slide it out to get a good look at the bottom of the feet.

In brief: Check feet daily!

Also, because many people with diabetes have neuropathy, or poor nerve function, they cannot always tell when there is a scratch or scrape or even a blister on their feet.
For this reason, they should visually inspect their feet every day. One way to do this is to keep a mirror under the bed, and slide it out to get a good look at the bottom of the feet.
Dr. Susan Wingo
Dr. Susan Wingo
Thank
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