What can I do about joint hypermobility syndrome?

Strong joint muscles. Joint stability is largely derived from the presence of passive stabilizers such as the ligaments and capsule around the joint that limit joint motion in all the possible directions. The dynamic stabilizers are the muscles surrounding each joint that can be helped by making them stronger and more efficient at helping to stabillize the joints in question. Physical therapy helps strengthen muscles.
Exercise. Evidence on effective treatments in JHS is variable but overall it seems that a program focused on increasing aerobic capacity, maintaining good dynamic control, and improving proprioception tend to be most successful. Meeting with a physical therapist who can help put together a safe and effective program would be ideal.

Related Questions

What is joint hypermobility syndrome?

See below. Hypermobile joints are joints that move beyond the normal range of motion. Joints most commonly affected are the elbows, wrists, fingers, and knees. Hypermobile joints often occur in otherwise healthy and normal children. This is called benign hypermobility syndrome. Read more...
Painful Joints. Joints that exceed their normal range of motion are "hypermobile". The condition is found mostly in women and has genetic relationships. There is an association of joint hypermobility and #fibromyalgia. Hypermobile joints potentiate people who have this condition to mechanical injury. Read more...

What is joint hypermobility syndrome?

Fingers bend back. Hypermobility is diagnosed when several joints extend ( move backwards ) more than they should, elbows small knucles and knees are common. It is not serious generally, and found in many gymnasts and indian rubber circus people. Read more...

Does anyone have any info on joint hypermobility syndrome?

Ehlers-danlos syndro. There is much info on these--more on the famous ehlers-danlos syndrome. Follow this link: http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmedhealth/pmh0002439/ hope you find the answer your are looking for. Good luck. Read more...
Poorly understood dx. JHS is symptomatic hypermobility. Many individuals who have hypermobility never have pain or require any treatment. When hypermobility is found associated with pain, or a few other criteria (see Brighton criteria) it is termed JHS. It is presumed to be caused by a defect in collagen but rarely have collagen related genes been implicated (TNXB gene). Read more...
The Brits. The best clinical medical literature on the subject seems to originate from England, where there are over two dozen clinics devoted to this disorder, which is a spectrum disorder from "benign" form to EDS and Marfans, both severe manifestations. IMO, the familial nature of fibromyalgia is explained by the marked association of fibromyalgia and JHS, which has genetic underpinnings. . Read more...

What is the condition called joint hypermobility syndrome?

Collagen disorder. Jhs is a constellation of symptoms that are very similar to marfans syndrome and erhlers danlos syndrome. It is due to an abnormality of collagen which causes tissues to stretch more than normally. Of course this increases your risk of joint problems, but can also result in heart problems and blood vessel problems. Read more...
Poorly understood dx. JHS is symptomatic hypermobility. Many individuals who have hypermobility never have pain or require any treatment. When hypermobility is found associated with pain, or a few other criteria (see Brighton criteria) it is termed JHS. It is presumed to be caused by a defect in collagen but rarely have collagen related genes been implicated (TNXB gene). Read more...

Is mckenzie method for benign joint hypermobility syndrome?

For disc issues. Mckenzie program is an exercise program aimed at identifying a neutral, pain free core posture and learning to maintain this through your active life style to minimize pain due to dosc based pain syndromes. Read more...

Is blue sclerae associated with benign joint hypermobility syndrome? Thank you.

osteogenesis . Imperfecta is the classic blue sclera condition. Here is a long list of other blue sclera conditions: http://telemedicine.Orbis.Org/bins/volume_page.Asp?Cid=1-2897-3497-3498. Read more...
No. Blue sclerae are typically associated with Osteogenesis imperfecta, not BJHS. There are extremely rare cases of Ehlers-Danlos (dermatosparaxis type and the described spondylocheirodyplastic form) that also are associated with a blue sclerae, as well as a Marfanoid-like condition called Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Read more...