12 doctors weighed in:

Is venous stasis considered reversible?

12 doctors weighed in
Dr. Ted King
Phlebology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Can control it but

Not cure it. As all of the others have said, chronic venous insufficiency (venous stasis) is very treatable but, true of all superficial venous insufficiency, it can't be cured.
The manifestations of cvi can be greatly improved with treatment but, long term, your veins will need to be chronically managed with periodic checkups and treatment in order to maintain the best results possible.

In brief: Can control it but

Not cure it. As all of the others have said, chronic venous insufficiency (venous stasis) is very treatable but, true of all superficial venous insufficiency, it can't be cured.
The manifestations of cvi can be greatly improved with treatment but, long term, your veins will need to be chronically managed with periodic checkups and treatment in order to maintain the best results possible.
Dr. Ted King
Dr. Ted King
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Dr. John Landi
Phlebology
2 doctors agree

In brief: CVI treatable.

Chronic venous insufficiency is due to malfunctioning of valves in the superficial, deep or both venous systems.
Although not reversible, it is treatable. The superficial valves, if leaking, can be closed via laser. The deep valves are treated symptomatically with elevation, compression hose, possibly lymphedema massage and compression pumps. The goal is to prevent worsening of the cvi

In brief: CVI treatable.

Chronic venous insufficiency is due to malfunctioning of valves in the superficial, deep or both venous systems.
Although not reversible, it is treatable. The superficial valves, if leaking, can be closed via laser. The deep valves are treated symptomatically with elevation, compression hose, possibly lymphedema massage and compression pumps. The goal is to prevent worsening of the cvi
Dr. John Landi
Dr. John Landi
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Dr. Khashayar Salartash
Surgery - Vascular
2 doctors agree

In brief: Not reversible

Generally venous stasis refers to the discoloration of the skin and other skin changes that are manifestations of long standing venous insufficiency.
When these changes occur they are not reversible. However all is not lost. The key is to prevent worsening of the manifestations of venous insufficiency and to stop it from getting any worse.

In brief: Not reversible

Generally venous stasis refers to the discoloration of the skin and other skin changes that are manifestations of long standing venous insufficiency.
When these changes occur they are not reversible. However all is not lost. The key is to prevent worsening of the manifestations of venous insufficiency and to stop it from getting any worse.
Dr. Khashayar Salartash
Dr. Khashayar Salartash
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Dr. Douglas Joyce
Phlebology
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Yes

Venous stasis is a condition of skin changes which is due to an abnormality in venous return caused by valve problems that allow blood from deep high-pressure veins to enter the low-pressure veins just under the skin.
These veins become enlarged, letting fluid go through their walls creating swelling, letting blood go through their walls creating discoloration and finally having so much back pressure that nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin. This results in ulcers. It is treated by removing the areas of abnormal flow using laser ablation.

In brief: Yes

Venous stasis is a condition of skin changes which is due to an abnormality in venous return caused by valve problems that allow blood from deep high-pressure veins to enter the low-pressure veins just under the skin.
These veins become enlarged, letting fluid go through their walls creating swelling, letting blood go through their walls creating discoloration and finally having so much back pressure that nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin. This results in ulcers. It is treated by removing the areas of abnormal flow using laser ablation.
Dr. Douglas Joyce
Dr. Douglas Joyce
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Dr. Scott Bolhack
Wound care
1 doctor agrees

In brief: VSU

The underlying condition for venous stasis is venous hypertension that can be controlled through both surgical and non-surgical means.
Once the condition develops, the underlying pathophysiology does not change. Individual areas of reflux can be repaired, however, but without compression, new areas of reflux will invariably develop. Controlling with compression is the key.

In brief: VSU

The underlying condition for venous stasis is venous hypertension that can be controlled through both surgical and non-surgical means.
Once the condition develops, the underlying pathophysiology does not change. Individual areas of reflux can be repaired, however, but without compression, new areas of reflux will invariably develop. Controlling with compression is the key.
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Dr. Scott Bolhack
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1 doctor agrees

In brief: No

No only treatable and controllable.

In brief: No

No only treatable and controllable.
Dr. Robert Schlessel
Dr. Robert Schlessel
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