Is varicose vein surgery painful?

It depends. Although every procedure has some discomfort associated with it. How much you feel depends on what you are having done. If you have surgery or an endovenous thermal procedure, you will get an anesthetic during the procedure so that you won't feel anything. The amount of pain you will have afterwards will be worse with surgery but your doctor can prescribe medicine for you to keep you comfortable.
Typically No. Varicose vein treatments have come a long way since the days of "vein stripping". Treatments (such as vnus closure) are done in the office in about 30 minutes and only require local anesthetic. There is no downtime. You can go back to work immediately and back to exercise in 4 days. The only sensation that you typically feel is a "pinch" while the your physician is numbing your skin.
Yes. Every procedure or surgery is to some degree painful. Most of my patient have their pain controlled with ibuprofen/advil. They need that for 4-7 days approx. It is therefore moderate pain. They usually feel the pain was worth it.
Laser closure. I do a procedure called laser ablation closure of the saphenous veins. It is not painful. The procedure is done under local tumescent anesthesia which is a very dilute local anesthesia which is injected along the course of the saphenous veins prior to layering. Sometimes oral sedation is also used. If there are large varicose veins these are removed through small micro (2mm) incisions.
Depends on Treatment. Although every surgical procedure has some degree of discomfort, there are definitely certain vein treatments that are more painful than other. The least invasive, or sclerotherapy, has mimimal pain. Laser or rf ablation involves a few shots of novacaine and then it is painless. Patient report pain relief with Ibuprofen alone during the recovery. The most painful is phlebectomy or stripping.

Related Questions

I had venus closure surgery for my varicose veins. It was not successful. What are my options? I need to try another option to rid my legs of these very painful and unsightly veins.

Venous . Venous closure uses radiowave energy to destroy diseased veins. It has a very high success rate. It is so rare that most doctors would "make good" on the treatment with a complimentary higher energy re-treatment with the same technique for with an alternate technique. In my office we would treat with tumescent anesthesia to numb the leg and "push the blood out of the vein". Then we would use a "double injury" laser and microfoam combination treatment. You would immediately return to work with a 99% chance of success. Read more...
Depends. "unsuccessful" could mean a lot of things. The main rzns for not meeting expectations after ablations are unreasonable goals, failure to close the vein, other veins that don't work, or that the vein ablated is not the dysfunctional vein that is causing the problem. Read more...
See an expert. Closure is over 95% successful, but not 100%. Either the procedure did not ablate the vein or there is another source of the problem such as an accessory vein. See an md with experience dealing with venous disease. Would steer you away from your prior treating md. At the very least need an ultraound to delineate what went wrong. Read more...
Need more treatment. As dr. Clark said, vein treatment is never 100% successful. Although it is 95% likely that your closure procedure was successful in closing the the vein that it treated, there is clearly more work to do. Another venous ultrasound is needed to find out where the problem is. Then it can be treated and your results will be better. Read more...
Vein Specialist. I practice in an area where i see people who have been treated all over the world so I have a chance to see many recurrences of veins and failures from prior therapy. My approach is always to do a venous ultrasound to identity the anatomy and look for the cause of the recurrent vein or why the original treatment did not work. See a vein specialist who will formulate a treatment plan for you. Read more...
Varicose veins. Occasionally a thermal ablation procedure will not be successful. However, a repeat of the thermal ablation procedure, either with closure or with laser would be advisable. Sometimes the failure to close is due to a very large size vein.I would advise a redo of the procedure, either the closure or laser ablation. Read more...

Does varicose vein surgery have medical benefits?

Absolutely. There are many medical benefits in having varicose vein treatment, including surgery. Generally, the major benefit of treatment is to control symptoms from your varicose veins like pain, swelling, throbbing, aching tiredness, fatigue, heaviness, etc., that can affect your ability to do your every day activities. Beyond that, treatment can decrease your risk of leg ulcers and blood clots, as well. Read more...
Yes. There is less swelling, heaviness, restlessness and cramping and a reduced risk for clot formation. Laser and radio frequency are more advanced options as opposed to older vein stripping techniques and are better tolerated. Read more...
Varicose Vein RX. Yes, treating varicose vein disease definitely has long-term medical benefits. When varicose veins are left untreated, they cause progressive valve damage to adjacent veins in the legs, causing progressive deterioration of the leg circulation. This spread of the vein damage leads to swelling, skin damage, ; progressive pain. Venous ulcers are the end-stage. Treatment of the disease prevents this. Read more...

How to cure varicose veins naturally without having surgery?

Comprehensive . You need a comprehensive approach to treating your lifelong, inherited disorder that has caused your varicose veins. It is easier now; no vein stripping anymore. Herbal medicines like venastat, rutin, reservatrol, and other antioxidants and antiinflammatory meds and prescription medical compression stockings can slow down the process and help the pain, heaviness, tired, restless symptoms. Vein doc. Read more...
No cure. Unfortunately, there is no natural or surgical "cure" for varicose veins. As dr. Morrison said, having varicose veins is lifelong. It can be controlled with treatment but it will never go away. Although there are supplements that might make your legs feel better and help any swelling, if you want your veins to go away, you will need to have treatment but surgery is no longer needed. Read more...
Natural Rx for veins. A support stocking and leg elevation will help but won't fix failed vein valves. No natural treatments I am aware of will replace a failed vein valve or reverse the reflux coming down an incompetent greater saphenous vein. Read more...
None that works. Varicose veins are due to leaking valves in the saphenous vein system. There is a strong hereditary component. There are many potential home remedies such as horse chestnut, diosmin, escin and certain kinds of berries but none of these work. If you have varicose veins, then you should see a vein specialist for a f/u venous evaluation including a venous ultrasound. Read more...

My wife has small varicose veins at multiple places and surgery is not recommended. Is there a cure?

Treatment. No Cure. Spider veins / telangectasias (small varicose veins) can be treated locally. It is important to make sure your wife doesn't have underlying venous insufficiency, which i don't she has. This is usually treated first. Next the small spider veins can be treated with either foam sclerotherapy, laser therapy or a combination thereof. Read more...
Absolutely. Both spider veins and true varicose veins can absolutely be successfully treated. The most important thing is to have an ultrasound to determine if she has underlying reflux or insufficiency, which can be cured by laser closure or ablation. Spider veins can be treated by superficial laser and injection sclerotherapy. Understand however, that she will likely develop new spider veins as she ages. Read more...
Can help. See dermatologist for possible laser or injections to make less visible. Read more...
No guarantee. I have to agree with dr. Aalami, there is no cure for vein disease. Although there are very effective treatments, as all of the others have talked about, nothing will guarantee that you will never develop more vein trouble as time passes. See a vein specialist for treatment recommendations but expect new trouble to pop up over time, even with very good treatment results. Read more...
Compression stocking. The only way to prevent further worsening of the varicose veins is to wear compression stockings. Even this is no guarantee but it will decrease the chance of recurring veins. Read more...
Varicose veins. if these are spider veins, they are more common in women due to hormonal changes. Treatment would be sclerotherapy to close these veins, but this is a local treatment and will not impact on the possibility of new vein development. Use of bioflavonoids, commonly found in certain fruits and vegetables, such as berries, and citrus fruits, are of benefit. These work to strengthen blood vessel walls. Read more...
Varicose veins. If your wife has varicose then she should see a vein specialist. There are many ways to treat VV's but in order to treat them, a full venous evaluation is necessary including a venous ultrasound looking for malfunctioning valves of the saphenous system. Usually recommendations to not treat veins are given by those without experience in their treatment. Most VV treatment are minimally invasive. Read more...

Is there any way to get rid of my varicose vein without surgery?

Scleroterapy. Vv can be treated with sclerotherapy, injecting dilute amounts of various solutions known as detergents into the lumen. This method may require several sessions to rid the vv. Read more...
Depends on what you. Mean by surgery. There is no way to get rid of varicose veins without doing something that isn't at least minimally invasive. For the most part, this involves being stuck by a needle. If you don't include being stuck by a needle then i would call sclerotherapy and endovenous laser and rf non-surgical. If you include being stuck by a needle as surgery, then there is nothing available. Read more...
Varicose Veins. If you mean a surgery with incisions put on your legs, then often the answer is yes. The veins can be cured with less invasive methods such as use of lasers or vein infections such as sclerotherapy. Radiofrequency ablation is another treatment options. Sometime surgery requiring leg incision is needed, but not very often. Seek a board-certified vein specialist (vascular surgeon) for opinion. Read more...
Varicose veins. large of varicose veins are most often being treated at this time with a thermal ablation procedure which does not require open surgery. Spider veins most commonly treated with sclerotherapy or laser. This also does not require surgery. Identification of the issue as to why there are varicose veins is crucial to aid in a plan of management. This can be accomplished with a venous Doppler-sono. Read more...

I just had varicose vein surgery had the age 18. Can I still participate in sports?

Yes. Once your recovery is judged satisfactory by your surgeon, you need to exercise to stay in shape - important for general vascular health. Compression garments are quite the rage with some athletes, check with your doctor to see if you may benefit from it. Read more...
More than likely. Get it cleared with the doctor who treated you first but it is likely that sports participation won't be a problem, once you have fully recovered from the surgery. Read more...
Varicose veins. Yes you can and should as exercise is crucial to leg and vein helath. Read more...
After recovery. Yes, after you have healed & recovered. If incisions were placed on the leg for the procedure, I usually advise about 2 weeks before you play sports. If a more simple procedure was performed such as a vein injection or catheter treatment, you potentially could return to sports sooner than that. You should check with the vein surgeon who did procedure & they will let you konw exact # of days. Read more...
Sports. yes remaining active is very crucial to all formal health, to include the circulatory system-arteries and veins. You may consider using support stockings after engaging in sport activities to help with reduction of lactic acid buildup and muscles. Read more...

Can I participate in sports after varicose vein surgery? I just had varicose vein surgery had the age 18. Does this mean I can't participate in sports anymore?

No . No it does not. You will want to give your legs a chance to heal but after that you should be able to return to your prior activity level. Most surgeons limit activity for 4-6 weeks following vein surgery to allow legs to heal and swelling to diminish. After that there are no limitations. Exercise can be helpful to the deeper vein pumps in your legs and may diminish leg swelling. If you are on your feet a good deal you might want to consider continuing to wear your compression stockings if you still have any varicosities. Always clear activity with your surgeon but most patients have improved exercise after this surgery as their painful varicosities have been removed. Read more...
No. Most varicose vein surgery such as phlebectomy , vein ligation and saphenous vein ablation have short recovery periods which limit or Prohibit vigorous exertion for a few weeks to a few months and then you can resume your normal activity including sports. Check with your surgeon to be sure. Read more...
Depends. Exercise post varicose vein surgery is dependant on multiple factors. Type of surgery, stripping, laser, radiofrequency. Plus or minus sclerotherapy. Site of veins treated as well as the type of exercise activities that you are planning to undertake. Best to speak directly with the surgeon who completed or is going to complete your vein procedures. Multiple factors...Unable to answer. Read more...
Not at all. I completely agree with drs. White, wright, and rutledge. Your surgeon will let you know what your activity limits should be, and for how long. Different doctors differ in their recommendations along those lines but, bottom line, after some period of recovery and healing, you should be able to do absolutely anthing you want as far as sports, activity, and exercise is concerned. Read more...

How do I get rid of my varicose veins without surgery?

Many ways. There are many possible treatments. Large visible varicose veins usually have an underlying source that you can't see. That is why it is so important to have an evaluation with ultrasound to make sure that any underlying vein trouble is identified and treated. These days, underlying vein trouble is treated with laser, rf ablation or foam sclerotherapy. The best doctor to see is a phlebologist. Read more...
Not likely. The best way to rid yourself of varicose is going to involve some form of surgery. You should start with an ultrasound of the leg that will let you know if the saphenous vein has reflux. This can be fixed with endovenous ablation. Then if there are residual veins they can be addressed as well. See a vein specialist. Read more...
You cant. You could do sclero injections. I would still call it a procedure/ surgery as it does have risk. Read more...
Depends. Really depends on the size. Smaller (spider) veins can be treated with injection sclerotherapy or laser. Larger veins can be treated with chemical or heat treatment. Compression stockings can be used to control larger veins. Read more...