8 doctors weighed in:
Is there a way to find out whether the clogged arteries are from cholesterol or blood clot?
8 doctors weighed in

Dr. William Purtill
Surgery - Vascular
4 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
An ultrasound can usually help.
The patients history also helps. Clogged arteries are most commonly caused by atherosclerotic plaque. It is caused by smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, increasing age and personal history of a heart attack or stroke. The plaque builds up and narrows or blocks the arteries. A blood clot may affect the arteries but mostly the veins.

In brief: Yes
An ultrasound can usually help.
The patients history also helps. Clogged arteries are most commonly caused by atherosclerotic plaque. It is caused by smoking, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, increasing age and personal history of a heart attack or stroke. The plaque builds up and narrows or blocks the arteries. A blood clot may affect the arteries but mostly the veins.
Dr. William Purtill
Dr. William Purtill
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1 comment
Dr. Gurmukh Singh
Cholestrol deposits may precipitate a blood clot. Blood clots may be detected with D-dimer test, a negtive test rules out more than a positive test rules-in.
Dr. Alan Koslow
Surgery - Vascular
2 doctors agree
In brief: Need more info
What arteries? How were they diagnosed? What are symptoms? Most clogged arteries start with cholestorol buildup till you get plaque rupture then clot forms.
Embolic clots are more rare.

In brief: Need more info
What arteries? How were they diagnosed? What are symptoms? Most clogged arteries start with cholestorol buildup till you get plaque rupture then clot forms.
Embolic clots are more rare.
Dr. Alan Koslow
Dr. Alan Koslow
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Dr. Doug Hansen
Family Medicine
In brief: Anatomy & physiology
Arterial and venous disease are very different phenomena.
Although there are always exceptions to the rule... Anatomically and physiologically speaking, cholesterol is typically a risk factor for arterial disease, while blood clotting is most often related to venous disease.

In brief: Anatomy & physiology
Arterial and venous disease are very different phenomena.
Although there are always exceptions to the rule... Anatomically and physiologically speaking, cholesterol is typically a risk factor for arterial disease, while blood clotting is most often related to venous disease.
Dr. Doug Hansen
Dr. Doug Hansen
Thank
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