I have venous stasis ulcers. Which kind of physician should I see about this?

Treat the cause. Although a wound care center or a vein specialist can treat your ulcer, it is important to make sure that you treat the cause (venous insufficiency) of the ulcer. Treating your vein problem will help your ulcer heal more quickly and will also help to keep it from coming back once it is healed.
Vascular Surgeon. A physician board certified in both vascular surgery and phlebology specializes in venous disorders and will be the most knowledable resource for your care. You can search for a vein specialist in your area with these credentials by visiting the american college of phlebology website: http://www.Acpsite.Net/ and go to the "find a physician page".
Venous stasis ulcer. Vein specialists who take care of all aspects of venous disease best manage venous stasis ulcers. Treatments are supportive to help heal the stasis ulcer and also therapeutic such as endovenous ablation using EVLT, EVLA, ELVeS, VNUS Closure, Venefit, ClariVein or sclerothrapy, among others.
Venous Stasus ulcer. You should see a wound care specialist in your area. Look for the cws certification which stands for certified wound specialist. In a comprehensive wound care center, the group of professionals will provide you with information, treatment, and referral to subspecialists like vascular surgeons that specialize in veins.

Related Questions

I have venous stasis ulcers. Who has the best website for easy to understand information on this subject?

Website for venous . I have not come across any sites that i would consider best. Use healthtap™ to ask any questions and review the comments by the physicians that post answers here using the key words: venous stasis, chronic venous insufficiency, veins, etc. Read more...

I have edema and a venous stasis ulcer. Help please?

Elevation/Compressio. Elevate legs above your heart when at rest. Blocks of wood under the foot of your bed. Compression stockings, 20-30mmhg gradient at all times whenever upright and off when laying down. See a vein specialist for further testing with ultrasound that can uncover the source of the problem. Read more...
Vein hypertension. You need an evaluation by a clinician that understands this disease process. Seek help from your internist , wound care physician, vascular surgeon etc. Read more...
Vein treatment. As dr. Vorhies said, compression is the mainstay of treatment for venous leg ulcedrs and for edema. As dr. Bolhack said, the problem is venous hypertension coming from blood not flowing properly in your leg veins. Compression helps to control the increased venous pressure and reduces the inflammation the pressure causes. It is important that you have a venous ultrasound and treatment. Read more...
See vein specialist. Leg ulcers with weeping are often caused by chronic venous insufficiency which is a problem that causes to much pressure to be in the veins near the skin. A venous specialist can diagnose and treat this condition. Our cure rate with venous ulcers is 97%. Read more...

How does wrapping my leg help with venous stasis ulcers?

Lowers vein pressure. Wrapping the leg with a venous stasis ulcer will dramatically decrease te pressure in the veins. This reverses the process which caused the ulcer in the first place. Healing does not occur overnight. It will take weeks to months depending on how large the wound is. Read more...
Yes. However the actual wrapping or compression bandage has to be placed by someone that has training in this procedure. Read more...
Reduces pressure. It also reduces inflammation. As dr. Salartash said, it is important for the wrapping to be applied by someone who is experienced. Just applying a wrap without proper compression isn't helpful. Read more...
Venous disease. Venous disease is the disorder; compression is ultimately the path to control. Due to abnormal blood flow in the return of blood to towards the heart, the pressure inside the most distal leg veins become distended, and fluid eventually leaks through the tissues to the skin and ulcer develop. Compression, the level at which needs to be determined for your safety in the way to control this condition. Read more...
Moves fluid. Venous leg ulcers are related to pooling of blood in legs and fluids in tissues compression literally squeezes it outa there. Read more...
Decrease pressure. Venous stasis ulcers are due to venous hypertension which is usually due to either increased back pressure in the saphenous system or perforator systems or both. This is due to malfunctioning (refluxing) valves in these veins. Compression helps to decrease venous hypertension and increase venous return. A venous reflux ultrasound would identify the problem. See a vein specialist. Read more...
Multifactorial. Wounds need to be addressed in several ways. Some factors include: infection control, wound debridement, and compression therapy. Read more...

Are venous stasis ulcers successfully treated by hyperbaric oxygen?

Can help. With venous ulcers hyperbaric oxygen can help by increasing oxygen tension to the localized area. However you need to be evaluated to determine if there is an underlying vein problem that can be corrected. Read more...
No. Venous stasis ulcers are the result of venous hypertension due to venous reflux, and worsened with obesity. The treatment is to get rid of venous reflux (venous ablation, remove varicose veins), lose weight. When combined venous and arterial insufficiency is present with both types of ulcers seen, some might consider treating with hbo. Read more...
Hyperbaric and VSU. There are no studies that prove without a doubt that hyperbaric oxygen helps with the healing of venous stasis ulcers. This is not one of the cms covered benefits; and by default, most insurance plans will also not approve. Read more...
Not standard care. The standard of care for the treatment of venous leg ulcers would be compression, not hyperbaric oxygen, as dr. Bohack said. Read more...

Could skin tears turn into venous stasis ulcer?

Transformation. If you have underlying venous hypertension, the condition that causes venous stasis ulceration, then a skin tear could potentially not heal resulting in a non-healing wound due to underlying venous stasis. Technically this would be a multifactorial reason for the wound not healing. Read more...
Yes. Venous stasis is caused by valve problems that allow blood from deep high-pressure veins to enter low-pressure veins just under the skin. These veins enlarge, letting fluid through the walls (swelling), letting blood through (discoloration) and finally having so much back pressure that nutritious arterial blood cannot enter an area of the skin resulting in ulcers or inability to heal minor wounds. Read more...