How long does it usually take for a diabetic foot ulcer to develop?

Multiple factors. It can hours to days - multiple risk factors lead to ulcers and amputation, pressure, neuropathy and trauma are the major risk factors. The amount of each of those determines time frame. Poor circulation and foot deformities among other things which have a role in time frame.
Diabetic foot ulcer. Once a diabetic has underlying neuropathy, with the loss of feeling in the lower extremities, an ulcer can develop within a short time. A small, unnoticed pebble in a shoe can result in an ulcer within a hour or two with walking or rubbing. This is why it is imperative for all patients with diabetes to check their feet daily and their footwear always before donning.
Very quickly. Depending on your diabetic control, circulation and and the causing injury it could develope overnight.
Can develop quickly. Diabetics are at a higher risk for foot problems due to possibly having diminished, sensation and circulation in the feet which may lead to diabetic foot wounds, infection, gangrene, and possible need for amputation. Seek professional advice to see how you can prevent possible complications.

Related Questions

I have pad and a diabetic foot ulcer, I have been taking percocet 10mg/325 but it does not relieve the pain very long, what type of pain medication and how many mg will help me stay pain free through the day?

Nothing. You need to get the blood vessels open and circulating blood to the areas that are lacking blood and are anoxic and ulcerated. Try nattokinase 3 pills 2 times a day taken on an empty stomach. See a doctor who does chelation therapy to clear the toxins in your body and restore circulation. Then the pain may go away without the narcotics.
Need further workup. The Percocet will not fix the problem, it just masks the pain. First, you need a full workup to make sure you do not have an underlying infection (maybe even of the bone). If the pain is coming from infection, then antibiotics will help resolve the pain. Second, you need a thorough work up of your circulation to make sure it is adequate, if not vascular intervention may resolve the pain.
Serious problem. You have a serious problem my friend. It is bad enough to have diabetes with a foot ulcer. And now you have pad. That pain you feel is from the pad. There may be no amount of pain medication that will relieve your pain. The pain is from a lack of oxygen to your foot. This needs to be evaluated and perhaps corrected asap by a vascular surgeon. It will help the pain and help you heal.

How is a diabetic foot ulcer best treated?

Depends on site. This is dependent on many factors: locations, depth, involvement of deeper structures, underlying deformity, present medical status, actual cause (not all ulcers in diabetics are diabetic related) and compliance of the patient.
Multiple remedies. Wound care requires multi-discipline input for proper wound healing. There are multiple modalities and multiple strategies to get a wound closed but it takes a knowledgeable well trained specialist to know when to implement the appropriate treatment during the course of wound healing using evidenced based medicine.
Special care. Offloading of diabetic foot ulcers, good nutrition, glycemic control, regular wound debridement by your physician, and local wound care are essential for wound healing.
Wound care.. Diabetic ulcers will generally heal if you offload the area (decrease direct pressure with an insert, or a wheelchair), have your doctor trim the callus and dead tissue away on a regular basis, and if the ulcer is infected, you may need oral or IV antibiotics, depending on the severity of the infection.
Dfu. Cannot answer directly as these need to be seen. A well-trained clinician will take a history, evaluate, consider the factors of the diabetic control, the depth and status of the wound (Wagner Stage), infectious considerations, vascular status (clinical and testing), and then push for redistribution of pressure, ideally with a total contact cast.
4. 1. Keep weight off the foot. 2. Control diabetes. 3. Don't smoke. 4. See a podiatrist.

How do you correctly clean & debride a diabetic foot ulcer?

See a MD. Do not do this yourself! This is most safely and effectively done by a foot and ankle surgeon. One in your area can be found at www. Orthodoc. Aaos. Org/footankle.
See a physician. Such as a podiatrist or wound care specialist to get proper care and evaluation. That is just the start. Your internist and endocrinologist and possible a vascular specialist will also need to be consulted to work together to resolve problem. Do not debride this on your own!
Carefully. This is only something a professional should do.
Proffesional care. Treating diabetic foot ulcer is best accomplished with a team approach. Optimal outcomes can be achieved when your primary physician work together with a podiatrist, neurologist, endocrinologist, vascular surgeon, orthopedist, nutritionist, infectious disease specialist, and pedorthist when indicated. Do not attempt to take care of it on your own. Seek professional advice and treatment.
Rx Diabetic Ulcer. There are two main causes of diabetic foot ulcers: neuropathy and arterial. These have different forms of treatment. Unfortunately, both can be involved in the same ulceration so attention by a trained health professional is vital. Contact your primary care physician, wound center, or podiatrist for further workup and attention. They will be the ones to debride the wound and instruct on cleaning.

Can a silver sulphadiazine topical be used for a diabetic foot ulcer?

Silver dressings. Yes, this medication is a safe prescription medication used as one of an armamentarium in treating a diabetic foot ulcer. All foot ulcers should be seen by a health care professional as the consequences of a self-treatment failure can be muscle, tendon or bone infection; amputation; hospitalization; or sepsis and death. Do treat this condition by yourself!
Yes. As long as you don't have any allergies to sulfa medications or silver.
Yes. Some use this type of cream under certain circumstances. Different types of creams are available depending on the needs of the wound.

Are there any sprays or creams I can use to cure a diabetic foot ulcer?

No. There is no spray or cream that will cure an ulcer. The cause of ulcer must be determined, whether it is circulatory, excessive pressure, infection etc.
Yes and no. Offloading of diabetic foot ulcers, good nutrition, blood sugar control, regular wound debridement by your physician, and local wound care are essential for wound healing. There are many types of topical creams or ointment that can be of benefit under certain circumstances depending on the type and condition of the ulcer.
Diabetic foot. You need to seek care from wound center or podiatrist as soon as possible. The evaluation of a diabetic foot ulcer requires a careful history, investigation of your neurological status of your feet, an assessment of the blood flow, and a comprehensive treatment plan that may include debridement, cultures, offloading (which is the most important issue most of the time), and testing. Do not delay!

Can docs explain what does the start of a diabetic foot ulcer look like?

Often it will. Start with a callous...Under the callous an ulcer will form...
The start can vary. A diabetic foot ulcer is best diagnosed with a physical exam. Your physician will ask you to remove your shoes in order to inspect your feet. They will look for redness, calluses, bruising, blistering, swelling, and for open sores. Sometimes the ulcer may be hidden and will be discovered following the debridement of calluses or the deroofing of blisters.

I have pad and a diabetic foot ulcer, I have been taking percocet 10mg/325. What else can I do to help?

Doctors. You should be working with your primary care physician to maximize blood sugar control and also seeing a podiatrist for treatment if the ulcer. He may also refer you to a vascular surgeon to improve circulation to the legs and feet. These doctors can also discuss methods of pain control and wound care.
Neuropathy? It's is also common to have a peripheral neuropathy with diabetic foot ulcers. This could be the cause of your pain and there are neuropathy pain medications that help. Another more limb threatening cause could be from "rest pain". This means your limb isn't getting enough blood supply. A vascular surgeon could help determine its cause.
Wound care.. Diabetic ulcers will generally heal if you offload the area (decrease direct pressure with an insert, or a wheelchair), have your doctor trim the callus and dead tissue away on a regular basis, and if the ulcer is infected, you may need oral or IV antibiotics, depending on the severity of the infection. The Percocet is only for pain, it will not help to heal the ulcer.
Special Care. Offloading of diabetic foot ulcers, good nutrition, glycemic control, regular wound debridement by your physician, and local wound care are essential factors in improving the potential for wound healing.
TEAM APPROACH. Taking an opioid makes me think the PAD is severe and the cause of the pain. You need a team approach with your PCP, podiatrist well versed in wound care or a wound care clinic and vascular surgeon.