How long does a foot amputation take?

Short. Usually less than an hour, depending on how much debridement is needed, anatomical issues, technique, etc. Anesthetic choices are general, spinal or regional block. Your surgeon and anesthesiologist will advise.
Times vary. Surgical time required to perform the procedure may vary depending on the type of surgery, the complexity of the infection, and the area involved.

Related Questions

How long will surgery take for half a foot amputation?

Hemifoot amputation. Surgeons vary in their times to do procedures and its no different for foot amputations. But with what i know about amputations, it should not take more then 1.5 hours in the average surgeons hands. Read more...
Less rhan 1 hour. Depends on the surgeon. In my hands no more than 45 minutes -1 hour. Read more...
Amputation. As stated , it depends on the surgeon. Speak to your surgeon with questions such as this as well as any others you may have . Good luck. Read more...

How long is the recovery after a foot amputation?

Foot Amputation. The answer is forever. You must constantly and vigilantly protect your stump. Healing usually takes one year. Read more...
Recovery time varies. Recover time will vary depending on many factors including age, general health of the patient, infection control, blood sugar control, post-operative and follow up care. Read more...

I have diabetes and had a foot amputation. What can I do to take better care of myself?

Preventative care. Keep your diabetes in check (make sure your hga1c is <7) and protect your feet. Prevent pressure sores and keep an eye on your wounds. You can wear protective orthotic shoes and see a podiatrist on a regular basis. Read more...
Prevention is key. Control your blood sugar. Work with your primary care doctor or see a specialist. See a podiatrist every two moths who can evaluate the need for protective shoe gear and insole as well as monitor general foot structure and vascular status. Read more...
Education / Care. Take better care of yourself by maintaining a good control of your blood sugar, eating a nutritious healthy diet, exercise, use properly fitting shoes with custom inserts, and do not smoke. Read more...
Amputation. I am sorry to hear an amputation in someone so young. Protect your feet at all times, look at your feet several times a day, wear white socks, see your podiatrist regularly and control your diabetes as best you can. Good luck. Read more...
Better. Control of blood sugar and immediate attention to any wounds. Sorry to hear about amp but be proud of yourself for, wanting to take better care! Read more...

How do you exercise after a foot amputation?

PT can help. It really helps to work with a pt familiar with amputees. Effort, optimism and support will be essential as you first start walking with a prosthesis. Exercise is needed to strengthen arms and legs and improve balance and stability. As you probably know, there are many famous athletes with amputations who compete in marathons, biking, skiing and swimming. (see www.Activeamp.Org). Read more...
Modify. You may have to modify your routine exercise. There will be certain limitation to consider. You want to avoid anything that causes further breakdown of your skin, leading to ulceration and further infections and amputations. Shoe modification is also very important.Depending on the level of the amp, you may need fillers to help. Also ask your doctor if any work is going to be done on your achilles. Read more...
PT / Rehab. After the surgical site from the amputation site is fully healed, consult with a physical therapist or with a rehabilitation specialist and go over the exercise options that are best for you. Read more...

What actually happens during a foot amputation?

Series of steps. Anesthesia is provided, followed by tourniquet application. Skin is preserved to cover the amputation site, and all muscle-tendon tissues and blood vessels cut to expose the bone. A saw device is used to resect the bone and remove the amputated tissues. Closure of the skin flap is done to protect the exposed ends of the live tissue. Read more...
Surgical removal. The involved gangrenous or infected area is surgically removed. Read more...

How much weight will a person lose after a foot amputation?

Not really related. First, the weight of the foot, not trying to be funny, but it is the first thing i thought of after reading. It should not be related. I would think weight gain would be more of a concern, due to limited activity. When fully healed, try exercising by using a kick board in a swimming pool. Stay active despite the surgery. Are you diabetic? Read more...
Minimal. Amputating a foot partially or totally will not really caused a lot of weight loss. What may lead to weight loss is the psychological affects that comes with loosing ones foot. This may lead to depression, and in turn cause a decrease or absence of apatite. Read more...
May gain or lose . Some may gain weight while others may lose weight following and amputation. It depends on the individual. Read more...

Can you tell me if there are natural ways to deal with the pain of a foot amputation?

Phantom Limb. It is quite common for amputees to experience sensations on the removed limb. Many times it is pains, for others, it can feel different (itching for example). A study reported in nejm found that using a mirror to 'visualize' the removed body part actually helped resolve those sensations. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmc071927. No matter what, discuss things with your doctor or surgeon. Read more...
Yes. Phantom limb pain can be problematic for many patients with an amputation at any level. I recommend these to my own patients with phantom limb pain. - stay active - find distractions when you are having phantom pain - mirror therapy. A 2007 study published in the nejm found that using a mirror to visualize and move the un-amputated limb reduced pain for patients in their amputated limb. Read more...

Relation between diabetes and foot amputation?

Yes. Diabetes destroys the peripheral circulation. Faster when out of control, slower with good control. The feet as the most distant part of the circulation are the most vulnerable. Good news, the Insulin pumps just keep getting better. If you don't have one yet, you may in the near future. Read more...
Vascular problems DM. Advanced diabetes leads to vascular issues that lead to tissue compromise starting at the distal extremities. When its bad enough, amputations start. The lesson is to control your diabetes as best possible and avoid any other risk factors for atherosclerosis. Read more...
At risk. Statistically diabetic have an overall higher probability of developing gangrene and foot infections that will result in amputation as compared to those who do not have diabetes. Read more...