12 doctors weighed in:
Can having diabetic neuropathy raise your chances of getting a heart disease?
12 doctors weighed in

Dr. Oliver Aalami
Surgery - Vascular
3 doctors agree
In brief: Yes, indirectly
It is not the neuropathy that increases the chance of heart disease, rather diabetes itself which is a risk factor for heart disease.

In brief: Yes, indirectly
It is not the neuropathy that increases the chance of heart disease, rather diabetes itself which is a risk factor for heart disease.
Dr. Oliver Aalami
Dr. Oliver Aalami
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Dr. Payam Rafat
Podiatry
2 doctors agree
In brief: Yes.
Diabetes increases your risk of cardiovascular disease.

In brief: Yes.
Diabetes increases your risk of cardiovascular disease.
Dr. Payam Rafat
Dr. Payam Rafat
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Dr. Arthur Heller
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Yes, indirectly
Diabetes prematurely ages the blood vessels, in and of itself can increase the risk for heart attacks, angina, stroke.
Also associated with neuropathy. Patients with diabetic neuropathy have increased risk of "silent" heart attacks, i.e. May not have symptoms that go with heart attacks, such as pain, discomfort, but have ekg, stress test or echo evidence of heart damage.

In brief: Yes, indirectly
Diabetes prematurely ages the blood vessels, in and of itself can increase the risk for heart attacks, angina, stroke.
Also associated with neuropathy. Patients with diabetic neuropathy have increased risk of "silent" heart attacks, i.e. May not have symptoms that go with heart attacks, such as pain, discomfort, but have ekg, stress test or echo evidence of heart damage.
Dr. Arthur Heller
Dr. Arthur Heller
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Dr. Michael Korona
Radiology - Interventional
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Yes
Diabetes is a risk for heart disease.

In brief: Yes
Diabetes is a risk for heart disease.
Dr. Michael Korona
Dr. Michael Korona
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Dr. Matt Malkin
Anesthesiology
In brief: Yes
Diabetes can greatly damage blood vessels over time.
Damage to small vessels supplying nerves in the feet are often the first signs of end-organ damage. Physicans check the urine for signs of damage to kidney filtration vessels. Eye vessels are also at risk. Large studies showed that diabetes is an independent risk factor for heart disease and attack via coronary artery disease.

In brief: Yes
Diabetes can greatly damage blood vessels over time.
Damage to small vessels supplying nerves in the feet are often the first signs of end-organ damage. Physicans check the urine for signs of damage to kidney filtration vessels. Eye vessels are also at risk. Large studies showed that diabetes is an independent risk factor for heart disease and attack via coronary artery disease.
Dr. Matt Malkin
Dr. Matt Malkin
Thank
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