Dental phobia since botched intubation: how effective are drugs, sedatives?

Works very well. A trained doctor in sedation will make your experience smooth and easy. Sorry to hear about the incident.
Very effective. Anti anxiety drugs and sedatives such as ativan, valium, and xanax (alprazolam) are very good at relieving extream dental anxiety.
Very. Ask your dentist for a prescription for an anxiolytic to take before surgery. If the phobia is profound, find a dentist who works in a hospital or and let an anesthesiologist take care of you.
Very effective. but rather than suffer in fear in the future consider Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Behavior Therapy, Psychotherapy, Exposure therapy (imaginal exposure therapy, systematic desensitization, flooding, prolonged exposure therapy, in vivo exposure therapy) or hypnosis as possible options. Psychotropic medications are sometimes indicated as well.

Related Questions

I've got dental phobia: how effective are the sedatives?

Good; don't go alone. Xanax (alprazolam) and valium are the most prescribed, but it is only recommended if you have someone else drive. They are usually prescribed in 3. 1 the night before, one the morning of, and 1 about 30 minutes before your dental appointment. They are safe and very effective like this. Also helpful is hypnosis, music, and acupuncture. Read more...
Take that first step. First, possibly go in and meet the dentist and his/her staff and find out how they do their procedures. Some dentists practice sedation dentistry, which will not place you totally asleep, but you takes some meds prior to the appointment and this really helps you relax, even with cleanings. Read more...
Sedatives generally . make both children and adults not care what happens. Read more...
CBT. For a more long term solution as an alternative to relying on sedatives, consider seeking a cognitive-behavioral therapist who specializes in phobias. One method they use is systematic desensitization which slowly and incrementally brings the person closer and closer to the thing they are afraid of in slow, graduated steps that help make the anxiety more tolerable. Read more...

I have a dental phobia: how effective is sedations?

Helpful. Proper dental care is essential to your overall health. If a fear of going to the dentist has kept you from regular exams and treatment, then it would be good to a dentist about sedation for any needed work. This can be very helpful. Read more...
Very effective. There are different degrees of sedation. Use the lightest regimen you can. Oral conscious sedation is safest. The deeper the sedation the greater the risk. It is the depression of respiration that is the greatest concern. Read more...
Very effective. Dental sedation for phobic patients is wonderful. In my practice, we use either oral or IV sedation, or a combination of the two. Many times, once the immediate dental treatment is finished, patients will not require conscious sedation, but may get by with only nitrous oxide because of the elimination of the dental pain issue. Read more...
CBT. Seek a cognitive-behavioral therapist who specializes in phobias. One method they use is systematic desensitization which slowly and incrementally brings the person closer and closer to the thing they are afraid of in slow, graduated steps that help make the anxiety more tolerable. Read more...
Comfort zone. The appropriate anesthesia depends on the complexity of the dental treatment and your own comfort zone. With the profound local anesthesia and IV sedation you will have no recall of the events of the dental treatment or experience any pain. In your case IV sedation is recommended. Best of luck. Read more...

I need some advice for dealing with anxiety and dental phobia?

At least two options. With the phobia try desensitization approaches, including 1) establishing a practice that builds your ability to stay calm in the face of the anxiety. This could include mindfulness or meditation practices; then 2) expose yourself to images associated with the feared procedures; then 3) use your calming practice to cope with feelings as they arise. If this doesn't help consult with a professional. Read more...
You are not alone. If you fear a visit to the dentist, you are not alone, many people experience dental anxiety. Sedation dentistry is providing a safe, comfortable relaxing and anxiety-free experience for certain people receiving any dental treatment. Depending on your degree of fear or anxiety, different levels of sedation may be required include general anesthesia. Read more...
Dental phobia. consider Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Behavior Therapy, Psychotherapy, Exposure therapy (imaginal exposure therapy, systematic desensitization, flooding, prolonged exposure therapy, in vivo exposure therapy) or hypnosis as possible options. Psychotropic medications are sometimes indicated as well. Read more...
VRT for Phobias. Phobias and anxieties respond well to Virtual Reality Therapy(VRT). VRT is exposure therapy in a safe environment. The research suggests VRT is 90% effective. Seek out a therapist who uses VRT in your area. You can find providers through www.psious.com, www.limbix.com, or www.virtuallybetter.com. Read more...

I was diagnosed with severe dental phobia and was given Valium 10mg. Only made me sleepy so please tell me what is stronger? Please help!

Ear acupucture? Have you considered auricular acupuncture?You can have a combination of small needles which remain in the ears for up to 7 days for a dental anesthesia protocol & an anti-anxiety protocol (auricular trauma protocol). Both protocols work quite well. Neither will sedate you. It is very safe. My acupuncture patients with painful dental post -op problems are finding it works better than narcotics. Read more...
General Anesthesia. General anesthesia performed by someone other than the dentist performing the tooth repair. This can be done as an outplacement at a hospital or with a dental anesthetist in a dental office. While it may seem expensive...The dentist can do a better job and the treatment can be completed in fewer visits actually saving you money. Read more...
You are not alone. People are anxious about going to the dentist for different reasons, cross infection, pain, money, etc. Share your fears. If you're stressed or anxious, tell your dentist and the dental staff. Explaining your concerns will let your dentist adapt the proper sedation, anesthesia and treatment to your needs. Read more...

Can you tell me how do I get over dental phobia?

A visit. Visit the dentist with someone and observe some pleasant experiences. Read more...
See your dentist. Painless dental treatment may sound like an oxymoron, but new techniques and advanced anesthesia are making it a reality for many patients. It helps you to save cracked teeth, maintain your natural smile, continue eating the foods you love and improve your general health. Read more...
Find a great dentist. Find someone you get along with and makes you comfortable.....I would run from anyone claiming to be painless....those people scare me and hide behind devices and ploys....I treat people daily that swore they needed sedatives and to be 'asleep' Have a good dental experience and start to forget all the bad ones that kept you away! Read more...
CBT. Seek a cognitive-behavioral therapist who specializes in phobias. One method they use is systematic desensitization which slowly and incrementally brings the person closer and closer to the thing they are afraid of in slow, graduated steps that help make the anxiety more tolerable. Read more...
Dental phobia. For Phobias consider Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Behavior Therapy, Psychotherapy, Exposure therapy (imaginal exposure therapy, systematic desensitization, flooding, prolonged exposure therapy, in vivo exposure therapy) or hypnosis as possible options. Psychotropic medications are sometimes indicated as well. Read more...

I have a dental phobia but I need dental work bad, what do you suggest?

Phobia. Find a nice office where dr will listen to you and help u overcome fears. Dental work can be done comfortable. Consider sedation or meds, etc if you still need them. I like a dr taylor in moro bay. Be proactive to avoid harder work. Dr needs to listen to you and your needs. Read more...
Please read the. Following article. It is a wealth of information about this condition and what can be done for. Best wishes. En.Wikipedia.Org/wiki/dental_phobia dental fear refers to the fear of dentistry and of receiving dental care. A severe form of this fear (specific phobia) is variously called dental phobia, odontophobia ... Read more...
See a dentist ASAP. Painless dental treatment may sound like an oxymoron, but new techniques and advanced anesthesia are making it a reality for many patients. It helps you to save cracked teeth, maintain your natural smile, continue eating the foods you love and improve your general health. Read more...
Talk to your dentist. Explain your fear of dental work to your dentist. This will allow him/her to plan your dental work in a way that is least traumatic to you. This may include doing your work with sedatives, or being completely asleep to do the work. Read more...
Be honest prior to. It is imperative to explain all your concerns to your dentist prior to the inception of your treatment and the dentist and staff will accommodate you accordingly. Read more...
Options available... The dentists and oral surgeons I have referred patients to have been sensitive to their patients' fears and needs, have been entirely non-judgemental about them, and with the variety of techniques available today, have been able to find a suitable treatment to minimize pain and anxiety during the treatment. Do not delay treatment, though; dental infections that get out of control can get nasty. Read more...
CBT. Seek a cognitive-behavioral therapist who specializes in phobias. One method they use is systematic desensitization which slowly and incrementally brings the person closer and closer to the thing they are afraid of in slow, graduated steps that help make the anxiety more tolerable. Read more...

What to do if I have severe electric surge toothache, dental phobia. Hypersensitive tooth.?

See a dentist. You still should summon up your courage and get at least a dental diagnosis so you have more information. Good luck. Read more...
Probable infection. If you had an infection anywhere else in your body you would seek immediate treatment. Don't let this get out of control. Speak to your dentist about your concerns. You'll find your dentist to be willing and able to help you comfortably and competently resolve your dental issues. Read more...
GET HELP. NEVER live with this type of pain, most likely you can have a root canal performed at a competent specialist, most let you watch a movie while its completed. Then have a GENERAL dentist that you are comfortable with....there is no reason to FEAR the dentist, you dont have to like it but we are in a great place in medicine where most procedures are completed with minimum pain. Read more...
Pain control. And comfort and safety are the keys. It is up to you and your surgeon to choose the right anesthesia for you according to your needs. You may have local anesthesia, conscious sedation, deep sedation that depresses your consciousness; or general anesthesia, which makes you lose consciousness and remember nothing. Do not procrastinate and make a call today. Read more...
Get dental eval asap. Don't delay getting treatment of tooth problem. Then consider Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Behavior Therapy, Psychotherapy, Exposure therapy (imaginal exposure therapy, systematic desensitization, flooding, prolonged exposure therapy, in vivo exposure therapy) or hypnosis as possible options. Psychotropic medications are sometimes indicated as well. Read more...