Cost of hip arthroscopy for labral tear?

Covered by insurance. In most cases the procedure is covered by insurance. Codes exist for most of the main procedures that are performed. Some portions of the procedure are "unlisted" and patients sometimes need to pay this up front and then work with the insurance to pay this back to patient directly.
Covered by insurance. Indicated hip arthroscopy is usually covered by insurance. The total cost is highly variable depending upon what exactly is the nature of the hip problem and depending upon what exactly is being done at surgery. Definitely discuss this issue with your surgeon's billing office and your insurance carrier ahead of surgery.
$4000.00 to $6000.00. For hospital and doctor about $900.00. Her what other insurance estimate. X-rays $206 $35 mri $1984 $1614 intra-articular injection $1545 $1329 hip brace $1100 $684 surgery $25600 $2268 anesthesia $2015 $2015 hospital bill $15677 $6642.

Related Questions

Can I dance salsa again after a hip arthroscopy of labral tear?

Yes. Depending on the location and severity of the labral tear and subsequently how involved the arthroscopic repair is will determine how long it will take to get you dancing again, but full unrestricted activity is the goal of treatment. Read more...
Eventually, yes. Hip arthroscopy causes mild to moderate pain and discomfort, especially with hip flexion. Labral tear debridement by definition removes a source of pain. Once the portals heal and the muscles about the hip can tolerate contraction and stretching and regain a full arc of motion (1-6 weeks), more active physical exercise may be allowed (salsa, etc.). Discuss your rehabilitation with your surgeon. Read more...
Dance. Depending on your findings at arthroscopy, your return to sports/dance will be affected. It is important to realize that it is a major surgery and pain, discomfort and weakness can persist for months. Therapy and strength training are essential after hip arthroscopy to return to your desired activity. Read more...

Can I dance professionsally again after a hip arthroscopy of a hip labral tear?

Activity After Scope. Many activities can be resumed after a hip arthroscopy. In fact, professional football players, baseball players, and basketball players are returning to high level activity after this type of surgery. The recovery can take a few months, and extensive physical therapy is required to make the best recovery, but returning to sports, including dance, is possible. Read more...
Likely yes. About 82% of pro athletes return to play at the same level as prior to a hip scope. The average time to return to play at the professional level for impact athletes varies but is usually about 4 months. Even patients requiring cartilage work during hip arthroscopy (microfracture) return to play at the rate of about 78%. Read more...

What are the risks involved with having hip arthroscopy for a labral tear?

Several. All surgeries have risks and hip arthroscopy is no different. The usual risks are bleeding, infection, damage to nerves or blood vessels and continued pain. These are all very rare with hip arthroscopy but do exist. After labralrepair, somehips get very stiff and much therapy is needed to restore motion. Damage to the cartilage in the joint can also happen. Talk to your surgeon about these, . Read more...
Traction injury. Traction must be applied to surgical leg which introduces potential for traction (stretch) injury to nerves. Most commonly manifests as transient numbness or altered sensation in leg/foot, sometimes genitals depending on nerve affected. Permanent changes are rare. Limiting duration of traction during procedure minimizes risk. Other risks include infection, vascular injury, cartilage injury. Read more...
Minimal risk usually. Standard risks include but are not limited to: infection, nerve/vessel damage, persistent pain, injury from hip joint distraction (hip specific), the need for further surgery, DVT (clot in leg), as well as the standard risks of anesthesia. The same similar risks are present for other joints as well-- such as the knee undergoing knee arthroscopy. Definitely discuss with your surgeon before surgery. Read more...

How will the doctor do a hip arthroscopy to fix a labral tear?

2 incisions. Usually two small incisions, a traction table to create a working space by pulling on the leg, a small camera, a bur to remove the extra bone on the ball and socket that often causes the labral tear, anchors (screw like device that has a stitch coming from it) are placed into the bone, these stitches are used to tie the labrum back to a bleeding bed of bone on the socket. Read more...
Small incisions. Through several small incisions, a camera and instruments are passed into the hip joint. The labrum can be repaired by placing an anchor into the bone, and tying down the labrum to the bone and anchor. Read more...
Typically a patient. Is placed on a special table called a hip distractor. This opens the hip joint space up about 1cm. He or she will then make a series of poke holes to access the joint. Similar to a shoulder or a knee but much more difficult. Thank you! Read more...

Is physical therapy for a right hip arthroscopy re labral tear normally "1 day post op and then 1 time per week for first 6 weeks"? Seems quick.

Not necessarily. As long as there is nothing 2 heal, the sooner the better. Read more...
Depends on procedure. If this involved simple trimming of labrum may be adequate. More complex procedures requiring periods of crutch use and limited weight bearing may require more face time with the physical therapist. Also in my experience young motivated patients may not require as much time with the therapist, as they are more than able to perform exercises/home therapy as long as given proper direction. Read more...

How successul is a hip arthroscopy for treatment of a labral tear of the hip?

Usually very. Usually it is very successful with improvement in symptoms in over 90% of patients. About 85% of professional athletes can return to the same high level of play afterwards. This surgery requires a lot of physical therapy postop, and if a patient does not do his/her part afterwards, the results are less successful (scar tissue and tendonitis can occur which cause lingering pain). Read more...
Excellent. Hip arthroscopy is typically very successful if all of the pathology is treated. Labral tears can often be repaired, but if the tear is a result of hip impingement, the impingement must also be addressed. Read more...
Very. The success of healing a labral tear is high. People who struggle after surgery typically have significant cartilage wear. The extent ofthis cartilage wear dictates how well people reapond to surgery. Read more...
Hard to Say. You may want to consider stem cell therapy for your labral tear. So far the only practice that has significant research and patient base regarding stem cell therapy are the Regenexx Physicians Network. They have over 6500 patients in their registry with pretty good results. Check out Regenexx.Com. Read more...

I have had hip athroscopy for minor labral tear, 3 months post surgery I am still in agony. Is this normal?

Hip arthroscopy. "agony" is a strong word so if you are still having this degree of pain, i would have a repeat MRI with contrast (assuming you have no allergy to dye) performed. Read more...
No. Hip arthroscopy to remove injured tissue (labral or cartilage injury) should relieve pain within 2 -12 weeks progressively toward little to no pain. Repair of a labral tear or removal of bone due to impingement should also show progressively diminished pain within 1-3 months. Persistent agonizing pain points toward new or persistent pathology within the hip/pelvis/back. Further evaluation needed. Read more...
No. You should visit your surgeon and discuss. If pain persists you may need a second opinion. Read more...
Can be. It is not abnormal to take 4-6 months and even a year for the pain to go away. However, I am concerned about you being in agony. This should be evaluated by your surgeon. Read more...