What is hematology?

Blood. The study of blood and blood related issues like clotting. Anemias of various kinds, hemophilia, leukemia, bleeding disorders. It is a wide medical category and often doctors do both hematology and cancer as a single specialty.

Related Questions

What is hematology?

Disorders of blood. The study of blood related disorders include such things as bleeding disorders, clotting disorders, low blood counts (anemia, low platelets, low neutrophils), high blood counts, abnormal hemoglobin, and much more. Read more...
Benign and malignant. I divide hematology into benign and malignant heme. Benign hematology specialists diagnose and treat clotting problems, or red cell, hemoglobin, iron, white cell, or platelet problems (either too high or too low). Malignant hematology includes diseases like leukemia, mds, lymphoma, and myeloma. Stem cell transplant is a sub-specialty of malignant hematology. More info: http://bit.Ly/mymtva. Read more...
See below. Hematology is the study of the blood, blood-forming organs and diseases of the blood including benign and malignant conditions as well as abnormalities of the clotting system. Hematologist are specially trained to examine the blood and bone marrow and treat both benign conditions such as anemia (reduced red blood cells) and malignant conditions such as leukemia (abnormal white cell count). Read more...

What exactly is hematology?

Blood disorders. This is a subspecialty of internal medicine that deals with blood disorders. Some common issues include anemia (low red cells), bleeding disorders, thrombocytopenia (low platelets), and leukemias. Read more...
Blood science. Hematology is the science (and art) of blood and blood disorders; doctors trained and certified in this field sre hematologists. Check out this site- hematology.Org. Read more...
The study of blood. Hematology is a branch of medicine that studies blood disorders including anemia and various blood cancers like leukemia. Read more...

Hematology: what is the cause of childhood lymphocytic predominance seen from 2 weeks of age until age 8?

Viral encounters. This is likely due to viral exposures early in life. The lymphocytes are the primary cell involved in the processing of viruses. Since early in life most of these encounters are new, there tends to be a lymphocyte predominance in the white blood cell differential. Read more...