How is carpal tunnel syndrome typically diagnosed?

Usually Clinically. Carpal tunnel results from entrapment of median nerve & is typically a clinical diagnosis. Common symptoms are numbness of palm, thumb, first 3 fingers & weak hand grip. Tapping the wrist over the nerve & bending the wrist forward may elicit these symptoms & aid in diagnosis. Nerve studies may be helpful, but typically are not used as the diagnosis is often easily made based on symptoms & history.
History and exam. The history and physical examination will provide clues with the diagnosis of cts. An EMG is the gold standard for the diagnosis.

Related Questions

How localized is carpal tunnel syndrome typically?

Very. It is very localized. It only occurs in the wrist. Read more...
Very localized. Very localized. There are other nerve compression syndromes which mimic some of the symptoms but the carpal tunnel is about 1 inch long and located over the palm side of the wrist (see pic). However, carpal tunnel is typically manifested by numbness and/or tingling in the thumb, index, long, and half of the ring finger. Although aching may be reported, numbness and pins/needles are more common. Read more...
Nerve compression. http://www.handctr.com/carpal-tunnel-syndrome-q-a.html median nerve compression at the wrist gives numbness in the blue area and loss of muscle function in the large muscle of the thumb. However one can get symptoms up the arm to the elbow but occasionally past it. Read more...

How does carpal tunnel syndrome typically effect people?

Night and activity. Carpal tunnel syndrome (cts) typically causes hand numbness in the thumb, index, and middle finger. This can be associated with aching, pain, and tingling all the way up to the elbow. Some patients will even notice the pain/aching all the way up to their shoulder. The syndrome is diagnosed with EMG (a needle study) of the affected limb. Read more...
Carpal tunnel. Carpal tunnel is typically manifested by numbness and/or tingling in the thumb, index, long, and half of the ring finger. Although aching may be reported, numbness and pins/needles are more common. It can be reproduced by holding your wrist in the bent forward position for well over a minute or may be considered if you can elicit tingling with forcible tapping over the underside of the wrist. Read more...
Effects of carpal T. Normally this condition causes numbness in the thumb, the index finger and the middle finger. Sometimes it is painful, like burning or severe tingling. Sometimes it causes weakness, especially for muscles that move the thumb, which is tough, because we use our thumb and forefinger for almost all of our hand activities. Read more...

How can I diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome?

Physical exam. Numbness in the thumb, index,middle, and radial ring fingers. Weakness of the thenar eminence muscles, loss of dexterity, and loss of strength also occur. Numbness that awakens you at night indicates possible carpal tunnel syndrome. Tests include nerve conduction studies, and physical exam with phalen's,tinel's, and Durkin's signs being assessed. See a Hand Surgeon. Read more...

What is carpal tunnel syndrome? How is it cured?

Pinching. The median nerve runs through the wrist in a closed tunnel with eleven tendons. When the space becomes limited, the median nerve can become compressed causing pain and/or numbness in the first three digits of the hand. Mild cases can get better with bracing, severe cases may require surgery. Read more...

Help please! Is carpal tunnel syndrome temporary?

Depends... The duration of your carpal tunnel symptoms is dependent on how much nerve damage has been done. An EMG and evaluation by your physician can answer this question. Best of luck. Read more...
Not usually. Typically carpal tunnel is progressive if not treated. Conservative treatments include night time splinting and steroid injection. Carpal tunnel release via endoscopic or open means. Is the surgical treatment. Read more...

Help please! Is carpal tunnel syndrome permanent?

Not at all. Can be treated with conservative approaches, such as wrist splint, vitamin b-6 100 mg twice daily, local steroid injection. Surgery is simple, outpatient and may even be done through a scope, and success rate exceeds 95% in my experience. Seek a hand specialist and get some advice. Read more...
Usually not. Treatment can include splints, nsaids and steroid injections. Surgical treatment is very effective however carpal tunnel syndrome can lead to permanent nerve damage if it progresses without appropriate treatment. A hand surgeon can evaluate and determine the best treatment options. Read more...