Can a broken mouth guard cause jaw pain?

If the original. Unbroken mouthguard was causing relief, but now the broken one is causing pain, then it would be reasonable to assume that the broken one is causing the discomfort. I would recommend being seen by your dentist to determine the cause. I am assuming the mouthguard is in fact a "nightguard" and not an atheteltc "mouthguard". In the interim stop wearing the broken mouthguard.
Yes. A broken mouth guard has the potential of causing jaw pain. Although a mouth guard is most often used to protect teeth, it also affects the biomechanics of the jaw muscles as well as the jaw joint.
Mouth guard? Many patients use the terms "mouth guard", "night guard" and "splint" interchangeably. Another term is orthotic. I assume you mean a device to treat jaw joint problems (TMJ) or bruxism (clench/grind of teeth). If so, yes. The device must fit accurately for success. If the "mouth guard" was made by a dentist, return for repair/remake.
Sure. Did the mouthguard create relief for you before breaking? If it did, then the break may have altered the fit. Either the mg is not fitting correctly or the teeth are now not occluding on the mg the way it did before. Also, if you are not wearing at all, then the muscles and the jaw joints may be reacting to the change in the bite. See a dentist or tmj/tmd specialist asap.

Related Questions

Will using a mouth guard for teeth grinding cause jaw pain?

Yes, initially. Initially, when using a mouth guard, you may unconsciously continue to grind your teeth (bruxism). The mouth guard itself doesn't cause the jaw pain. The bruxism does because in the process of grinding, you put strain on your mandibular joint and the surrounding muscles. However, the mouth guard may make it more pronounced since you may grind more putting more strain on the jaw - temporarily. Read more...
Mouth guard. A well fitted professional mouth guard won't cause pain. A poorly fitted (either at home or an average job in a dental office) can cause pain. Many guards require a follow up visit for minor adjusting of the bite or the fit. Read more...
It can. Depends on the type of mouthpiece- hard or soft, upper or lower. If you have never had jaw pain before, even though you have been grinding, i would go back to the dentist who made the mg. Now, if it is stare bough (otc, ) get rid of it and see a specialist who can hopefully stop the grinding and not contribute to additional symptoms. Read more...
Mouth Guards & Grind. Mouth guards are to protect your teeth and oral area from sports related injuries. If you feel you are grinding your teeth you really need a dentist to work with to get you a custom appliance that is used to reduce the amount of grinding. The more custom the fit the better for you . Store bought ones 'might" work but not as good a custom one. Read more...
Possible. 2 reasons to wear a mouthguard for grinding are 1) to prevent tooth wear and 2) prevent damage to jaw/TMJ. Some guards actually make the grinding worse. See a TMJ expert for guidance about this. Any dentist can be a TMJ expert with the proper training and experience. Most commonly, oral surgeons, prosthodontists, and orofacial pain specialists. Ask MD, dentist and dental society for referral. Read more...
It could. A mouth guard is designed to protect teeth during contact sports. Custom made well designed and adjusted mouth guards are far superior to OTC appliances, and are less likely to cause joint distress. Night Guards (Occlusal Orthotic) provide symptomatic relief for joint dysfunction caused by grinding/clenching/malocclusion/trauma, and should relieve joint distress. Read more...

I bought a mouth guard. My jaw pain is gone but I have noticed my bite has changed. If I stop wearing the guard, will my bite return to normal?

Possibly. Can't really tell how exactly your bite has changed or by how much. Store bought appliances although cheap, do not perform like a professionally fabricated night guard. See a local dentist for help with both your bruxism and your bite. Read more...
Depends. Depending on the amount of time that you have been wearing the mouthpiece, the bite may or may not return to "normal." If it does, you may want to consider a different type of mouthpiece, not a thick mouth guard that may be shifting and moving the teeth or altering the jaw alignment. Read more...