What are bunions?

Structural deformity. Bunions are a bony prominence. They are progressive, structural deformities. You can improve the symptoms with better shoes, but you can't improve the deformity. My rule of thumb: if the deformity bothers you on a regular basis or is limiting your activity, then surgery is an option to consider. See your foot specialist for evaluation and treatment discussion. Dr l.
Bunions. Pressure and or congenital deformity, the big toe pushed into the second toe with pain and swelling at the joint. Bunions have a congenital link with lax or loose-joints, & are more common in females. To avoid bone growth, damage and recurrence, no high heels or tight shoes. Surgical treatment is available. See an orthopedic foot specialist or podiatrist.
Bunion. A bunion is a progressive disorder that is often described as a bump on the side of the big toe joint which may become painful. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the framework of that joint and possibly adjacent joints. In later stages, the big toe may lean towards the second toe which throws the bones out of alignment – producing the bunion’s “bump” which may lead to pain.
Hallux Valgus. Bunions are a progressive structural deformity of the foot characterized by a visible bump on the side of the foot at the base of the great toe as well as a leaning of the big toe into the other toes. X-rays are absolutely necessary to properly evaluate a bunion deformity and guide treatment. The simplest treatment is wearing better shoes. (no high heels). Surgery is sometimes indicated.
Hallux Valgus. That is the medical term for a "bunion" deformity. It is the increased angle of the joint of the great toe resulting in a bony prominence. It can be congenital, or acquired. Some medical conditions that disrupt the joint such as rheumatoid arthritis or neurological conditions (cerebral palsy) can cause it as well. Often it is due to inappropriate shoe wear. Symptoms due to irritation or arthritis.
Bunion. This term usually refers to the enlargement of the bone at the big toe joint. Some of this bone is normal , some is not. The term can also be used for the enlargement at the little toe joint - also called a tailors bunion. See your podiatrist for more info than we can post here as well as treatment options and biomechanical information.

Related Questions

What are bunions and what causes them?

See below. True bunions is the overgrowth of bone on the side of the big toe. They can be caused by trauma, tight shoes, hereditary. Read more...
Usually heredity. Bunions are the prominence at the joint where the big toe meets the metatarsal bone behind. They are usually associated with the big toe drifting toward the 2nd. While shoes often are blamed, the tendency to form them is linked to your foot type, which is hereditary. If they don't hurt, wear sensible shoes to avoid irritation. If they do, see a podiatrist to discuss surgical correction. Read more...
Bone prominence. Bunions are a bone prominence on the inside of the foot at the base of the big toe. This is a misalignment of the big toe joint secondary to foot function and genetics. Physical examination of the joint and x-rays are used to evaluate the deformity.Wearing shoes that don't irritate the prominence is helpful, but surgical straightening is usually necessary, to correct the problem. Dr l. Read more...
Many possible causes. .A bunion is a progressive disorder that is often described as a bump on the side of the big toe joint which may become painful. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the framework of that joint and possibly adjacent joints. Bunions may result from a variety of reasons such as genetics, trauma, biomechanical abnormalities, or as a result of inappropriate shoe gear. Read more...

What symptoms do bunions eventually give you?

Pain. Bunions can lead to pain and deformity of the foot leading to difficulty wearing shoes and difficulty in walking. Read more...
Pain. Bunions make the forefoot wider, making it difficult to find shoes that fit properly. Eventually shoe pressure will cause bursitis (inflammation of the soft tissue) or neuritis (inflammation of the nerve) in the area, making it painful to walk. Orthotics can help slow the development of bunions, although once the foot becomes chronically painful, surgery is usually required for relief. Read more...
Many possibilities. Possible causes that patients may experience pain due to a bunion include pressure from ill fitting shoes, joint arthritis, inflammation of the joint capsule or bursa, abnormality of joint alignment, and nerve damage. Read more...

I'm curious what occurs after bunion pins are removed?

Depends. They could be removed as it is time and this is good as you are healing, or they can be removed early due to a problem like an infection. Read more...
REMOVAL. There are pins, and there are screws. For the most part, screws are not removed. If pins (K-wires), I'll just tell you my way; there are different ways pins are uses. My wires are sticking out of the skin, and are removed in the office w/o anesthetic, and for the most part painlessly. This is at 3-6 weeks post-op. Read more...

I know what bunions look like, but what exactly are they?

Enlargement of bone. In a bunion deformity the first metatarsal adducts or moves away from the midline and the great toe abducts or moves toward the midline of the foot. The excessive motion in the metatarsal bone causes enlargement of the metatarsal head causing a bunion deformity. Read more...
Misalignment of bone. Bunion are structural deformities that are progressive. They are, normally, secondary to abnormal foot function. The foot rolls in too much causing the big toe to be pushed towards the second toe. The big toe then pushes the first metatarsal bone the opposite direction. Over time this leads to the bony prominence "bunion". The joint becomes misaligned over time and becomes symptomtic. Dr l. Read more...
Abnormal "bump" A bunion is a progressive disorder that is often described as a bump on the side of the big toe joint which may become painful. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the framework of that joint and possibly adjacent joints. In later stages, the big toe may lean towards the second toe which throws the bones out of alignment – producing the bunion’s “bump” which may lead to pain. Read more...

Can you tell me what occurs after bunion pins are removed?

All depends. On which of the myriad bunion surguries was performed. Discuss with your surgeon. Read more...

What is a bunion? How do you treat it? Why are they so painful?

Bone. Bunions are when the toes bend inwards so to speak. It can be genetic or due to tight shoes. Get checked out and they may x ray your feet to see how bad they look. They are painful because of the bend, but can be treated surgically or with orthotics. Read more...
Bony deformity . A bunion is a bony bump on the joint at the base of your big toe. It happens when your big toe points toward your second toe.Things you can do to improve the pain are wear wide, low-heeled shoes, or special shoes designed to have extra space around the big toe. Do stretching exercises – this helps the toe and foot joints move better.Wear a bunion pad – this is a small cushion that keeps the big toe from rubbing against your shoe. You can also ice it after exercising, or take Ibuprofen or advil or tylenol (acetaminophen) as needed. Read more...

What happens after bunion pins are removed? How long is recovery?

All depends on the . Procedure and how you are healing. This should be explained/discussed by your surgeon. Read more...

What is a bunion? And hallux valgus?

See below. A bunion is just the enlargement of the bone on the outside of the 1st metatarsal head. Hallux valgus is the malpositon of the 1st metatarsal and 1st toe where the big toe turns in towards the 2nd toe. Read more...
Structural deformity. Some differences, but basically used interchangeably. Bunions are a bony prominence with joint misalignment. They are progressive, structural deformities. You can improve the symptoms with better shoes, but you can't improve the deformity. My rule of thumb: if the deformity bothers you on a regular basis or is limiting your activity, then surgery is an option to consider. Dr l. Read more...
Abnormal "bump" A bunion is a progressive disorder that is often described as a bump on the side of the big toe joint which may become painful. The visible bump actually reflects changes in the framework of that joint and possibly adjacent joints. In later stages, the big toe may lean towards the second toe which throws the bones out of alignment – producing the bunion’s “bump” which may lead to pain. Read more...