Is there any kind of discharge involved in vaginal cancer?

Sometimes. Vaginal cancer is very rare, but can cause discharge, as well as non-period bleeding from the vagina and pain when you have sex. Other causes of discharge from the vagina, such a yeast infection or sexually transmitted infection, are much more common. Any unusual discharge from the vagina is cause for concern, and often treatable, so you should see a healthcare provider about it!
Yes . There could be bleeding or spotting of blood. There can also be superimposed infections with bacteria or fungus giving yellowish or white discharge and resultant odor.

Related Questions

Do I have vaginal cancer? I have constant discharge between periods and my vagian seems to be sagging or enlarged. I'm 17.

It would be. Remarkable for a 17 year old to have "vaginal" cancer. But you need an expert to look at your "parts", internal and external, and help you figure out your symptoms, learn your history (sexual, family, other conditions) and you do a disservice thinking i can discernwhether you are fine or are in trouble on the internet. Read more...

What type of laboratory values are too high or too low in vaginal cancer? Thanks

Not the key. Bloodwork isn't the key either to detecting, to diagnosing, or to treating any of the vaginal cancers or vulvar cancers. If you have a suspicious lesion there, it needs to be biopsied. If you do not, stop being concerned. Take it from this pathologist -- all the miracles of today's labs are often no substitute for the directed physical exam. Best wishes. Read more...

Does a pap smear check for all types of vaginal cancer or just the cervical type?

Usually, yes. A cervical cytology (pap smear) is scraped along the cervix usually, but can also be scraped along the vaginal wall. Squamous lesions (dysplasia or carcinoma) are the most commonly found. However, endometrial tumors are shed through the cervix into the vagina. Certain sarcomas (rhabdomyosarcoma: malignant skeletal muscle tumor) can also be found. Generally, a pap is an excellent screening tool. Read more...

How common is vaginal cancer?

Rare. The rate is 1 in 3, 300 people, or 0.03% of the population. Risk factors for vaginal cancer include: history of abnormal pap smear, hpv warts, previous hpv infection, ano-rectal cancer, vaginal intraepithial neoplasia, and multiple sexual partners. Smokers have a harder time fighting hpv infections and thus have higher rates of vaginal cancer. Read more...
Rare. There are fewer than 1000 cases/year in the us. See this site for more info. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/pmh0002479/. Read more...

How common is vaginal cancer?

Not very. According to the american cancer society, there are estimated 2680 cases diagnosed in 2012, which is about 1/100 of gynecological malignancies. Read more...
Vaginal cancer. Very rare. It is 1/10th as common as cervical cancer. About 1200-1500 cases per year. Read more...

What’s new in vaginal cancer research?

Several things. Scientists are learning more about tumor suppressor genes, refining radiation therapy techniques, and developing new procedures for reconstruction after surgery. Read more...
Not much right now. There are no open protocols through the gog (gynecology oncology group). Researchers are studying the role of hpv in vaginal cancer and it appears that there is some role for chemotherapy but since it is less common than ovarian and cervical cancers there is less research. Read more...

How can you know you have vaginal cancer?

Bleeding/GYN exam. This often presents with no symptoms. The most common symptom is irregular vaginal bleeding, like after intercourse or between periods, or postmenopausal. Other symptoms are pain on urination, pain during intercourse, or pelvic pain. Probably the best way to find out if you have this is by routine gyn exam, pelvic exam, pap smear, colposcopy, etc.. Des exposure predisposes to this cancer. Read more...
Vaginal cancer. Your doctor would determine whether or not you have vaginal cancer. It is extremely rare. It can be found at early stages by a pap smear and biopsy. At later stages, it is seen and felt as a mass on pelvic exam. Read more...

What do you recommend for vaginal cancer?

Vaginal cancer. It depends on location and stage. A proximal (vaginal cuff) cancer that is stage i can be treated very well with surgery. Otherwise, chemo radiation is used unless it extends onto the vulva. Read more...