14 doctors weighed in:
Is a hysterectomy after menopause the best answer for hormone therapy if you have uterine fibroids?
14 doctors weighed in

6 doctors agree
In brief: It depends
Most fibroids shrink in menopause, even if you are treated with low-dose hormone therapy.
If, however, fibroids grow during menopause, that is a red flag for possible trouble. Hysterectomy will be your best bet to rule out the possibility of a cancerous growth, and to prevent further fibroid growth. Furthermore, you can then use estrogen alone which may be safer than estrogen plus progesterone.

In brief: It depends
Most fibroids shrink in menopause, even if you are treated with low-dose hormone therapy.
If, however, fibroids grow during menopause, that is a red flag for possible trouble. Hysterectomy will be your best bet to rule out the possibility of a cancerous growth, and to prevent further fibroid growth. Furthermore, you can then use estrogen alone which may be safer than estrogen plus progesterone.
Dr. Katherine Sutherland
Dr. Katherine Sutherland
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Waldo Acebo
Progesterone is needed and many time is the first hormone to decrease even in the Peri-menopausal years. Progesterone balances estrogens and many cancer protective properties for the Breast
Dr. Michael Traub
Fertility Medicine
2 doctors agree
In brief: Maybe
If the fibroids are still causing you problems then that may be the best answer. It is not the only option.
It depends how many, the size and location, and how you feel.

In brief: Maybe
If the fibroids are still causing you problems then that may be the best answer. It is not the only option.
It depends how many, the size and location, and how you feel.
Dr. Michael Traub
Dr. Michael Traub
Thank
Dr. John Kirk
Obstetrics & Gynecology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Generally no
Once menopause occurs usually fibroids will start to shrink or at least not grow.
Usually, the low doses available for hormone replacement of menopausal symptoms are so low they do no cause regrowth in the fibroid tumors. It is possible, however, for some fibroids to grow despite the low doses. Follow their growth with serial ultrasounds, perhaps.

In brief: Generally no
Once menopause occurs usually fibroids will start to shrink or at least not grow.
Usually, the low doses available for hormone replacement of menopausal symptoms are so low they do no cause regrowth in the fibroid tumors. It is possible, however, for some fibroids to grow despite the low doses. Follow their growth with serial ultrasounds, perhaps.
Dr. John Kirk
Dr. John Kirk
Thank
Dr. Carolyn Thompson
Obstetrics & Gynecology
In brief: Not necessarily
Hysterectomy is one method of treating fibroids.
Other methods include myomectomy (removal of only the fibriods), uterine artery ablation (to cut off the blood supply), and hormone manipulation. Fibriods tend to be less of a problem after menopause because their growth depends upon hormones; when hormone levels decrease after menopause, fibriods usually shrink.Periods stop, so bleeding does too.

In brief: Not necessarily
Hysterectomy is one method of treating fibroids.
Other methods include myomectomy (removal of only the fibriods), uterine artery ablation (to cut off the blood supply), and hormone manipulation. Fibriods tend to be less of a problem after menopause because their growth depends upon hormones; when hormone levels decrease after menopause, fibriods usually shrink.Periods stop, so bleeding does too.
Dr. Carolyn Thompson
Dr. Carolyn Thompson
Thank
Get help from a real doctor now
Dr. Jane Van Dis
Board Certified, Obstetrics & Gynecology
14 years in practice
47M people helped
Continue
107,000 doctors available
Read more answers from doctors