If you have high-grade cervical dysplasia, does that mean that you have cancer cells?

No. A high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (hsil) on pap smear typically equates to moderate to severe squamous dysplasia on cervical biopsy, a precursor to invasive cancer with high-grade lesions being more likely to progress (as opposed to low-grade lesions). Areas of high-grade dysplasia are typically surgically excised so that the chance of progression to invasive cancer is minimized.
High Grade Dysplasia. High grade dysplastic cells are pre-cancerous cervical cells that are limited to the cervical mucosal lining and have not invaded the tissue underneath. If untreated, you are at risk, months or years from now, for invasive cervical cancer. That is why your gynecologist will follow up with you and recommend one of several treatments to eradicate all of them and prevent such an event from occurring.

Related Questions

If you have high-grade cervical dysplasia, do you have cancer cells?

Not likely. High grade dysplasia is pre-cancerous, but patients with high grade dysplasia are susceptible to developing cancer. Because of the very high risk of developing cancer in association with high grade dysplasia, most patients are treated by a procedure called leep/cone. However, the treatment process is a collaboration between the patient and gyn, and you could request a second pathology review. Read more...

I have cervical dysplasia. Should I be worried about cervical cancer?

Possibly. Cervical dysplasia is considered a precursor to cervical cancer. However, many cases of cervical dysplasia spontaneously resolve without treatment. Most important is to repeat the pap smears as recommended by your gynecologist or family doctor to ensure that the dysplasia has resolved. Read more...
Yes . High grade dysplasia can. Low grade can become high grade but may also go away. Continue pap smears and gynecologist's recommendations. Read more...

Does cervical dysplasia always turn into cancer?

No, but need PAP smr. Cervical dysplasia is a risk factor for cervical cancer, but doesn't automatically guarantee cancer. You'll need regular PAP smears if cervical dysplasia is found - yearly surveillance. Make sure you inform your Gynecologist of any changes in your health. Some women don't want to be hassled with yearly visits, & choose to undergo a cone biopsy / cone resection (preserving fertility) or other surg. Read more...

Does cervical dysplasia always turn into cancer?

Great question. Without treatment, 30 - 50% of cases of severe cervical dysplasia progress to invasive cancer. The risk of cancer is lower for mild dysplasia. Read more...

If I have cervical dysplasia, could it definitely progress to cancer?

Yes. It definitely could progress to cancer. Fortunately, it usually doesn't. Nonetheless, because it could, it is imperative that you be followed with repeat paps and biopsies until it goes away or that you be treated to make it go away (and then be followed to make sure it has). Read more...
Usually No. Most commonly the dysplasia will resolve on ts own, not, in fact, progress to cancer. The greater the level of dysplasia (graded i, ii, or iii) the more likely it will progress but even the most advanced dysplasia may not become cancer. Not smoking and taking Folic Acid regularly may help your body to eradicate the dysplasia naturally. But don't avoid seeing the doctor! Read more...

If cervical dysplasia is present long enough will it turn into cancer?

Not necessarily. Cervical dysplasia does not necessarily turn into cancer. Since we have no way of knowing which cases will turn out badly, it would be prudent to follow your doctor's advice regarding repeat testing and suggested treatment. Read more...
Yes. Dysplasia is usually indicative of early cancer process. Cervical dysplasia is a premalignant squamous changes of the cervix. There are different terminology system now used in pap and biopsy. Generally, it includes low- and high grade dysplasia, representing low and high risk of progessing to cancer respectively. If you have dysplasia, you should see gyn oncologist for eval and managment. Read more...
Rarely. Most cases of cervix dysplasia are due to hpv infection which is self limited and resolves all by itself. The chances of turning into cervix cancer are rare. You are advised to do follow up pap smears as advised by your gynecologist. Read more...