6 doctors weighed in:

If you have high-grade cervical dysplasia, does that mean that you have cancer cells?

6 doctors weighed in
4 doctors agree

In brief: No

A high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (hsil) on pap smear typically equates to moderate to severe squamous dysplasia on cervical biopsy, a precursor to invasive cancer with high-grade lesions being more likely to progress (as opposed to low-grade lesions).
Areas of high-grade dysplasia are typically surgically excised so that the chance of progression to invasive cancer is minimized.

In brief: No

A high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (hsil) on pap smear typically equates to moderate to severe squamous dysplasia on cervical biopsy, a precursor to invasive cancer with high-grade lesions being more likely to progress (as opposed to low-grade lesions).
Areas of high-grade dysplasia are typically surgically excised so that the chance of progression to invasive cancer is minimized.
Dr. Brandon Smithey
Dr. Brandon Smithey
Thank
Dr. Morton Levitt
Pathology

In brief: High Grade Dysplasia

High grade dysplastic cells are pre-cancerous cervical cells that are limited to the cervical mucosal lining and have not invaded the tissue underneath.
If untreated, you are at risk, months or years from now, for invasive cervical cancer. That is why your gynecologist will follow up with you and recommend one of several treatments to eradicate all of them and prevent such an event from occurring.

In brief: High Grade Dysplasia

High grade dysplastic cells are pre-cancerous cervical cells that are limited to the cervical mucosal lining and have not invaded the tissue underneath.
If untreated, you are at risk, months or years from now, for invasive cervical cancer. That is why your gynecologist will follow up with you and recommend one of several treatments to eradicate all of them and prevent such an event from occurring.
Dr. Morton Levitt
Dr. Morton Levitt
Thank
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