Can you detect anal or colon cancer via a pap smear?

No. A pap smear is a screening test for cervical cancer. It does not detect anal or colon cancer. People 50 years and older should get a colonoscopy to screen for colonrectal/anal cancer.
No. Pap smears are specific to detecting disease of the cervix and rarely the inside of the uterus. To detect anal cancers, a regular checkup with rectal exams is recommended. If there are risk factors for anal cancers, there are anal pap smears that should be performed. Colon cancer screening begins with either colonoscopy or virtual colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, barium enema, and/or fobt.

Related Questions

I had post menopause bleeding. Not endometril cancer as biopsy clear. Pap smear ok. Ultrasound shows slight hyperplasia. But could it be colon cancer?

Please clarify... Are you asking about a source of vaginal bleeding, bleeding per rectum, or are you not sure of the site of bleeding? At age 51, you certainly qualify for and should undergo a screening colon exam (if you have not already accomplished same within the intervals established by medical convention). Read more...

My mother, 71 years old, colon cancer last year, took Xeloda (capecitabine) for six months. Went for yearly pap and found endometrium 8mm with abnormal outline.?

EMBX. A 71 y/o postmenopausal woman with 8 mm endometrial thickness may want to have endometrial tissue sampling, an endometrial biopsy (embx) done. Read more...
Endometrial biopsy.. In a postmenopausal woman with vaginal bleeding, the risk of cancer is approximately 7.3% if her endometrium is thick (> 5 mm) and . Read more...
Any vaginal bleeding. What was the Pap result? Why was it done at age 71? What prompted evaluation of the endometrium? Need more information to give appropriate advice. Read more...
Cancer linkages. The EM finding suggests she need for a biopsy. There are many things that could account for the finding, but with a history of cancer (and hence increased risk for cancer of the EM and some other sites) this needs to be evaluated. Colon cancers have several pathways to development that can cause cancers in other sites like the endometrium. Read more...

Pap = inflam ASCUS @ 63 yo. M/pause 10yrs. Symps = ext vaginal dryness discomfort & 2 UTI's. Not sexually active. Colon cancer & liver met 3 yrs later. Mom b/c @ 49. No FAP Rx'd Estrace (estradiol) Your thoughts?

Atypical cells. ASCUS- atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance. This is usually both treatable and reversible. Refer to low grade inflammation. Consider asking your GYN about estrogen vaginal cream. Read more...
Perfect. Reading your history that would be my recommendation as well. The estrogen in vaginal estrogen is very local and is not of systemic concern a risk. Would definitely recommend the estrogen to help with the vaginal atrophy. . Read more...

Pet scan, endescope, occult stools, pap smear, MRI abdomen. Neg. Colon ca 7/10 what to do? Also had a liver scan done... Neg. Female 59, nonsmoker, diagnosed colon ca 7/11, resection, followed by 6 mo. Chemo. Cea continues to rise since stopping chemo 3/1

You . You need to be restaged at this point: physical and repeat imaging, i.e. Ct or pet/ct. Read more...
This . This is difficult question to answer as I am not too sure about your conditions and tests that you describe. Basically i understand that you had colon cancer surgery in 7/10 or in 7/11, and have had a rising cea despite normal pet scan, normal MRI scan and normal "endoscope", but are scheduled for a colonoscopy next week? I do not know if you have had a recent ct scan abdomen, and pet scan of the whole body. These scans are highly sensitive and should be done as new testing, if they were not performed recently. A colonoscopy would also be strongly recommended. It depends on the stage of your first colon cancer and in which location in your colon was your prior cancer located. Hopefully they would not find recurrent cancer at the new intestinal connection. It sounds like you are having the appropriate evaluations with your oncologist, there are even some benign settings when a cea may rise. Keep up with the tests being recommended by your doctor, and i hope there would be good findings for you. Read more...

Is it possible to have anal or colon cancer without a lump in or around the anus? Again, I'm an 18 year old female. I think I might anal/colon cancer.

Please explain. I think both I and some of my friends have tried to reassure you, but the "bottom line" is that if you're having symptoms here that have lasted two weeks or more, it needs to be seen by your personal physician. Cancer's unlikely, but there are a host of other troubles here that can make you miserable. We can't examine you at a distance. Pick up the phone and get seen. Read more...

What is the difference between having anal cancer and colon cancer?

Location. An anal cancer may likely be a different cell type, located more near the skin of the anal opening. It may be treated differently with radiation and chemotherapy rather than surgery, depending on the cell type. Colon caner can be located anywhere in the large intestine, and is treated wth surgery to remove the tumor, and sometimes radiation or chemotherapy may be used after surgery. Read more...
Everything. Although both colon and anus are part of gastrointestinal tract and anus is a continuum of rectum and colon - anal cancer is completely different to colon cancer. They arise from different type of cells ( squamous vs adenocarcinoma) , they have different way of spreading, different risk factors, different therapy, prognosis etc. They are different in almost everything actually. Read more...

I'm 22 with minor anal leaking is that a common sign of colon cancer?

Uncommon. Thats an uncommon sign for colon cancer. Colon cancer is a very slow growing tumor with very few symptoms. We still need to explain your symptoms. I recommend a visit to your doctor. Read more...
First, there is. Underwear staining versus losing control of your bowels without realizing it. This is not usual cancer sign. You need an exam for sphincter tone and perianal sensation. Read more...

Would a family history of colon cancer make me more likely to get anal and oral cancer also?

NO. Anal and oral cancer share one risk factor in common: the human papilloma virus (hpv). A family history of colon cancer does increase the risk of colon cancer. Remember to get your colonoscopy. Read more...
Rectal yes. Family history of colon cancer especially in first degree relatives does increase your risk for colo-rectal-anal cancer. I don't believe there is an increased risk for oral cancer. Read more...
No. Anal cancer is distinct from colo-rectal cancer as it arises from different cell type - squamous cell. There is no diffinitive increased risk of anal or oral cancer in those with a family history of colo-rectal cancer. Read more...