What are the diagnostic tests for acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Bone marrow biopsy . The diagnosis is typically with a bone marrow biopsy, cytogenetics (dna of leukemia cells), and flow cytometry (cell surface markers of leukemia cells).
See below... A blood test (cbc with morphology) is usually the initial test when a diagnosis of leukemia is suspected. Afterwards, the studies that are necessary for a complete characterization include bone marrow aspiration for morphology, flow cytometry, cytogenetics, and molecular analysis, as well as lumbar puncture for CSF analysis. Other tests may also be necessary on a case-by-case basis.

Related Questions

What is the prognosis for a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Good. Prognosis is good--all in children is very treatable with many successful outcomes. Read more...
Good. The treatment for allis very long but very good. There are different risk groups of all depending on many factors. The best of these have a prognosis of 95% cure rates. The common risk groups have 80-85%cure rates. Read more...

Could you tell me about acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children?

See below. It is a blood cancer in children. With advances in the treatment the prognosis has improved quite a bit. It used to be universally fatal disease about 15 years ago but now most children survive and get cured. Read more...
See below... The most common type of cancer in childhood is leukemia. The most common pediatric leukemia is acute lymphoblastic leukemia, more specifically b-all. The patient needs to be in the care of a pediatric oncologist. The prognosis depends on many factors, one of the most important ones being the genetic abnormality, but is many times very good in children with cure rates at about 80-90%, even higher. Read more...

How typical is acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children in canada?

See below. Between 2003-2007, 1257 children (age 0-19 years old) were diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in canada. See the following website for more information about statistics in canada: http://www.Cancer.Ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/leukemia-childhood/statistics/?Region=on. Read more...

What are are the different protocols for acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Here are some links. This is an excellent site maintained by a heme-onc fellow on the east coast, and he has collected a few regimens for all. It's pretty tough to actually find a public site with this info: http://hemonc.Org/wiki/acute_lymphocytic_leukemia hope that helped you. Good luck. Read more...

Why is it that serum calcium levels reduce in acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Not important. This is the least of problems if you have all. There can be many causes, the commonest is low Albumin which automatically gives us a low value. But it is inconsequential. Tumor lysis can be another reason but it is not all that common. But your doctor can tell you the cause better than i can try to guess. Read more...

What is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all)?

Lymph system cancer. Lymphocytes are normal cells of the immune system that protects the body from infection. When these cells become cancerous, they grow out of control in the bone marrow, blood and other organs. All is very common in children but can occur in adults. With children, it is truly one of our success stories thanks to clinical trials with cure rates above 90%. Adults do not do as well. Read more...
Blood cancer. All is a form of leukemia which in turn is a form of cancer, more specifically blood and bone marrow cancer. The word "acute" means it progresses faster, as opposed to chronic cases that usually have a slower progression. The word "lymphoblastic" means immature lymphoid and describes the type of malignant cell involved in this leukemia, as opposed to other types of cells, for example myeloid. Read more...
ALL. ALL is a type of leukemia that starts from white blood cells in the bone marrow, the soft inner part of bones. It develops from cells called lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell central to the immune system, or from lymphoblasts, an immature type of lymphocyte. ALL invades the blood and can spread throughout the body to other organs, such as the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Read more...

I have a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

ALL. I'm sorry to here about your child with all. Do you have a question? The cure rate of all has improved dramatically over the years and is one of the success stories in oncology fsupporting the rationale of continued research and iterative improvements in care. Read more...
Question please?? I'm sure you are under tremendous stress and have a million concerns. The next year is going to be very intense and require someone to be a 24 hour a day caretaker. There will be hospitalizations, procedures, pain and tears. The great news is that most types of ALL are now curable if you follow the oncologist's care plan exactly. Please ask friends, family, any support people to help out!! Read more...