I have a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

ALL. I'm sorry to here about your child with all. Do you have a question? The cure rate of all has improved dramatically over the years and is one of the success stories in oncology fsupporting the rationale of continued research and iterative improvements in care.
Question please?? I'm sure you are under tremendous stress and have a million concerns. The next year is going to be very intense and require someone to be a 24 hour a day caretaker. There will be hospitalizations, procedures, pain and tears. The great news is that most types of ALL are now curable if you follow the oncologist's care plan exactly. Please ask friends, family, any support people to help out!!

Related Questions

What is the prognosis for a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Good. Prognosis is good--all in children is very treatable with many successful outcomes. Read more...
Good. The treatment for allis very long but very good. There are different risk groups of all depending on many factors. The best of these have a prognosis of 95% cure rates. The common risk groups have 80-85%cure rates. Read more...

I have a son who is getting treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. I want to plan for a second child but am afraid if he also gets the same?????

ALL in sibling. There is an increased risk of a sibling developing ALL. I would discuss everything with a geneticist and allow them to give you specific numbers. Also, the positive side is that a sibling creates a close possible bone marrow (stem cell) match. Be sure if you do go ahead with a second pregnancy, to harvest stem cells. Read more...

What are the chances of my child getting a secondary cancer after her leukemia treatment is completed? Daughter, age 9, treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, no radiation, 2.5 years of intrathecal and oral chemo meds.

A . A paper published by the national cancer institute in 2007 looked at secondary malignancy rates in over 16, 000 kids diagnosed and successfully treated for leukemia and lymphoma. Overall, the rate of a second cancer in kids treated for leukemia (not specifying what kind of leukemia or treatment) within 30 years after diagnosis was 2.4%. The chance of developing cancer in the general (adult and kid) population is 0.6%. In this study, most secondary cancers occurred in kids that were treated for leukemia between the ages of 1 and 4 years of age. The other thing to consider is that they were looking at patients treated in the late 1970's and 1980's and treatments may have changed since then. The good news is that your daughter has a lot of things going for her such as her age, the type of leukemia she had (usually very treatable with less toxic medications than other cancers), and the fact that she did not have radiation. So her risk might be even less than the other kids in that study. If you have any specific questions about her care, please talk with her oncologist. I hope she stays happy and healthy! (odds are she will.) legal disclaimer: I am providing this general and basic information as a public service and my response to this question does not constitute a doctor-patient relationship. For any additional information, advice, or specific concerns, please speak with your own physician. The information provided is current as of the date of the answer entry. Read more...
Secondary Cancers. The literature suggests that successfully treated all patients, who did not have radiotherapy, are at no increased risk for secondary cancers. With radiation, the risk has been cited as as much as 20-fold. Read more...

What is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all)?

Lymph system cancer. Lymphocytes are normal cells of the immune system that protects the body from infection. When these cells become cancerous, they grow out of control in the bone marrow, blood and other organs. All is very common in children but can occur in adults. With children, it is truly one of our success stories thanks to clinical trials with cure rates above 90%. Adults do not do as well. Read more...
Blood cancer. All is a form of leukemia which in turn is a form of cancer, more specifically blood and bone marrow cancer. The word "acute" means it progresses faster, as opposed to chronic cases that usually have a slower progression. The word "lymphoblastic" means immature lymphoid and describes the type of malignant cell involved in this leukemia, as opposed to other types of cells, for example myeloid. Read more...
ALL. ALL is a type of leukemia that starts from white blood cells in the bone marrow, the soft inner part of bones. It develops from cells called lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell central to the immune system, or from lymphoblasts, an immature type of lymphocyte. ALL invades the blood and can spread throughout the body to other organs, such as the liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Read more...

Chances of curing acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults?

Survival rates.... In adults are not as good as they are in children, but they are improving with time. Indeed, many young adults are treated on pediatric protocols and or by peds oncologists, and this has shown to be of some benefit. Taking all comers, adults with all have approximately a 40% os, while for children this number is approximately 85%. Some subgroups of pediatric all have 95% survival. Read more...

What are complications for someone with acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Many side effects. There are many potential complications for somebody with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all). Some are related to the leukemia and some are due to toxicities of the treatment. Typical problems include infection, bleeding problems, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mouth sores, hair loss, fatigue, and need for blood transfusions. There can be effects on fertility as well. Read more...

What are the chances of curing childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Depends. On the staging, the age of the child and the genetics of it. Read more...
Good. . This disease is curable in 80% of cases. There are many findings of the leukemia that can effect the prognosis. Some findings make the curability higher, some make it lower. Overall, there are good treatments for this disease. Read more...
>80% While there are many variables that determine the answer to that exactly - things such as type of ALL, CNS involvement, etc - the prognosis for ALL is greater than 80% now. Some types even exceed 90%. A lot also depends on early recognition and level of care. It's a must that well trained and up-to-date pediatric oncologists are treating. Read more...