Family history of breast cancer. Should I get brca testing?

Depends. Many people have a distant relative who had breast cancer late in life and that is not an indication for brca testing. There are certain criteria like very young breast cancer, male breast cancer, triple negative breast cancer before age 60, and others. Visit your family doc or gyn to see if you need a referral to a genetics health professional for testing.
Possibly. To figure out if BRCA testing would be useful for you, it depends on the number of individuals with breast cancer in your family, the age at development of breast cancer, degree of relatedness (first-degree etc.), and history of other ancillary cancers. This type of information can determine if you are at higher risk for breast cancer and if you are then BRCA testing may be useful.
See your doctor. Talk to your doctor regarding your family risks & have a yearly breast examination. Ask if there is a genetic counselor in your area to consult with.

Related Questions

How do I get tested for hereditary breast cancer?

History/blood test. The first step is to get a family history. If the history suggests a hereditary predisposition for breast cancer, blood testing to evaluate for brca1 and brca2 mutations could be done. Read more...
Do you have Fam hist. If you have family history go see the oncologist that saw your relative and he/she will direct you. Read more...
Red Flags. If you meet certain criteria, you are a candidate for brca testing. Check out www.Myriad.Com. Read more...

If two members of my immediate family developed breast cancer, should I get tested for the brca gene?

Possibly. It's always better to test the family members who have breast cancer if possible. If they are first degree relatives (mother, daughter or sister) and one was under age 50 at diagnosis, you might meet criteria for brca testing. It's best to meet with a genetic counselor who can help guide you and your family so the correct people are tested. There are non-brca mutations as well. Read more...
Maybe. It would be best if the family member with the breast cancer gets brca testing. If it was positive then you definitely need to be tested too. If she was negative, then the cancer was probably not related to brca gene mutations and you won't need to be tested. You still will be at higher for breast ca. If your family member was not willing or able to test, then you may want to be tested. Read more...
Depends. It would depend on your heritage and also at what age were your immediate family members diagnosed. I would seek the advice of a genetic counselor. Read more...
Absolutely. Women w/ 2+ immediate family members w/ a hx of breast/ovarian CA at 50% chance of developing breast cancer. If you have it, get screened with CA-125 blood test, ultrasound, mammogram/MRI, usually starting at age 30. Surgery after childbearing. Read more...

No one on family has any type of cancer except one great aunt breast cancer @ 71 I am Ashkenazic Jew should I get brca test?

What will do with. the result? Given your family history, you are not likely to have BRCA gene. However, before getting tested, you need to ask yourself, what will you do with the results? Will you get bilateral mastectomy if it is positive? For good health - Have a diet rich in fresh vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low fat milk and milk products, nuts, beans, legumes, lentils and small amounts of lean meats. Avoid saturated fats. Exercise at least 150 minutes/week and increase the intensity of exercise gradually. Do not use tobacco, alcohol, weed or street drugs in any form. Practice safe sex. Read more...

How many relatives need to have had breastcancer before you should get genetic testing for the BRCA genes? My mother contracted breast cancer, I am 40

Other factors must . be considered. If your mom had a harmful BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, breast cancer diagnosed before age 50, cancer in both breasts, both breast and ovarian cancers, multiple breast cancers or your ethnicity is Ashkenazi Jewish, talk to your GYN about genetic counseling to evaluate your potential risk. Read more...
Usually 2. With some exceptions, the number is two first-degree relatives (mom/sisters), before screening for BRCA. Exceptions include if there is a history of ovarian cancer, pre-menopausal breast cancer (age . Read more...
See genetics. Most breast cancer is NOT due to an inherited risk, but rather occurs by chance. Family history that suggests an inherited risk, such as changes in the BRCA1 gene or BRCA2 gene, include multiple relatives with cancer over more than one generation and younger ages of onset. If you are concerned about an inherited risk, see a geneticist who can assess your family history. Read more...