Why should I get tested for rheumatoid arthritis?

For remission. Don't ever assume you have this disease without being treated or evaluated . If properly diagnosed and treated early remission can occurr before crip[pling deformities. Please seek medical evaluation .
Careful. You should not have random blood tests for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) unless you have symptoms of RA because the blood tests do not make the diagnosis by themselves. The blood tests can be positive in normal individuals. On the other hand, if you have joint pain, stiffness, or swelling, it is important to have an accurate diagnosis as RA and other arthritides can be treated. Best if treated early.

Related Questions

How do I get tested for rheumatoid arthritis?

See a doctor. Start with your primary doctor. If you do not have one, get one or see a rheumatologist (medical specialist that cares for rheumatoid arthritis). Read more...
Doc orders tests. If your doctor believes that RA is a possibility the ccp antibody test is the most specific test commercially available for RA diagnosis. Read more...

What's the cost for getting tested for rheumatoid arthritis?

Depend on your need. There is no one simple answer. Some of the lab tests are very inexpensive, while others are very expensive. Depending on your clinical setting, the type of x-rays that are indicated, the need for additional imaging by ultrasound and MRI or other type of scanning, the price will vary. You can discuss this with your doctor, and if you decline certain test your doctor will decide how this may affect. Read more...

What exactly is the procedure for getting tested for rheumatoid arthritis?

See your provider. Your primary provider can examine you and oreder the blood test. Alternatively you could see a rheumatologist. Read more...

How often should one be tested for rheumatoid arthritis after negative test, though having symptoms?

See a rheumatologist. I would leave this decision up to the rheumatologist. It is known that there are false positive and negative tests for rheumatoid arthritis. It is important that physicians (and patients) understand that we need to take the whole picture into account when making any diagnosis. The physical exam and history is much more important than just following a blood test result. Read more...
Arthritis. There are negative test and there are additional tests that may be followed for a now symptomatic person with rheumatoid or infalmmatory as much as at a certain level. Talk to your doctor about this especially if you are taking medications. Read more...

I have itp - tested for rheumatoid arthritis 3 months ago - negative. Past 2 weeks I've got deep pain in arms, wrists, thighs, ankles, hips knees. Ra?

See rheumatologist. With two potentially serious autoimmune disorders, it is time to see your rheumatologist. Read more...
Other disease too. Itp is associated with several of the rheumatic diseases, and the commonest is systemic lupus, but several others. It may take some time for tests to turn positive and besides arthritis muscle inflammation can. Read more...

Why so some children get juvenile rheumatoid arthritis?

We don't really know. There seems to be a genetic predisposition to developing jra. It is thought that there may be environmental factors that trigger ones immune system to inappropriately attack one body tissues. (autoimmune) for example exposure to smoking has been implicated. Considerable research is being conducted on finding the exact triggers and autoimmune pathways. Read more...
Autoimmune. Jra (also called jia) for juvenille idiopathic arthritis is a disease of unknown etiology. There are many theories for why it happens, many believe there is a virus responsible. The damage to the joints, pain and stiffness is due to an inappropriate immune response which results in the immune system attacking tissues of the host (patient). Rheumatologists can provide appropriate DX and rx. Read more...

How do you get diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis?

History, physical. And labs and xrays if needed. Juvenile RA will be diagnosised in patient less then 18 years of age with most children geeting the illness at a younger age. It is an inflammatory disease including joint pain, swelling warmth and sometimes redness. Blood tests could be abnormal such as a positive ANA or rf or increased inflammation tests. Please see a physician since it may not be arthritis. Read more...
See a doctor. As always, the wisest course of action is to see your physician. He/she may refer you to a rheumatologist that will take a history, examine you and perform a number of tests, including blood work and possible x-rays. Based on this information, the rheumatologist will confirm the diagnosis and review treatment options. Read more...