What dmard is recommended for psoriatic arthritis?

Several Possible. Methotrexate and sulfasalazine are effective treatment options. Additional options are biologic dmards , which are tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, examples are embrel, humera and remicade (infliximab).
Psoriatic arthritis. There are a few...Too many to name here. Biologics, such as enbrel, Humira and remicade, (infliximab) are also considered dmards. They are highly selective agents that target specific internal events in the body that cause psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

Related Questions

Has any one taken the disease modifying drug (dmards) for their psoriatic arthritis?

Most patients need a. Psoriatic arthritis can be a very inflammatory disease. We all want pain relief for our patients, but rheumatologists understand the need to reduce inflammation, because it portends coniued damge to joints, as well as much earlier cardiac disease. My personal favorites: sulfasalazine with methotrexate, the latter given sc. Some, albeit few, patients need tnf-alpha inhibitors. Read more...

Can you tell me about taking the disease modifying drug (dmards) for their psoriatic arthritis?

See details. The two major DMARDs for treating psoriatic arthritis are Methotrexate and the biologics such as Remicade, (infliximab) Enbrel and Humira among others. All are extremely effective, especially the biologics. All have potential side effects such as infection risk, reduced blood counts and liver disease. Read more...

My psoriatic arthritis pain in the spine and fingers is mild. Doc has decided not to use any medication yet. When should he consider using DMARDs?

Quality. It really has to follow a detailed conversation about the risks and benefits of such in light of your quality of life and the severity of your condition. You should be an active part of the decision making process. Read more...

Should I find a doctor who specializes in psoriatic arthritis? My rheumatologist said that I "may have a mild form of psoriatic arthritis". He recommended that I take nsaids and just watch for further changes. Do you agree that I just watch it, or should

Rheumatologists . Rheumatologists are drs that specialize in all types of arthrtis. The pitting of the nail is found in psoriasis, and if that corresponds to a diagnosis of psoriasis in your case and the features of the arthrtis also correspond to psoriatic arthrtis so that is your diagnosis . There are a number of meds that are used for the treatment of psosiasis and psoriatic arthritis, disease modifiers and biologics , there are adds practically in all magazines and tv stations. You should ask your rheumatologist why he does not want to use those meds. Your rheumatologist may find that at this time your disease is to mild to use sronger meds. Read more...
No. A rheumatologist is an expert in managing psoriatic arthritis (psa). Nsaids are often an appropriate first line treatment of psa if the disease is mild and not causing permanent joint damage. If nsaids are ineffective, or if skin disease is severe, use of dmards like Methotrexate or biologics like tnf inhibitors may be appropriate. If your symptoms are not controlled, speak to your rheumatologist. Read more...
See below. While nsaids may control the pain, it is not going to stop the progression. Secondly, having psoriatic arthritis elevates your risk of cardiovascular disease. You obviously have concerns. Consider getting a second opinion with a rheumatologist as you may require a tnf inhibitor. Read more...

Is there a cure for psoriatic arthritis?

No, but.... Virtually all patients with psa can be put into remission. Read more...
No Cure. But there are highly effective treatments. Some are pills such as methotrexate. Often, we now use biologic medications, like Enbrel, Humira, Remicade, or Stelara (ustekinumab). Most recently a new pill was approved called Otezla. A rheumatologist is experienced in treating psoriatic arthritis. Read more...
Can be treated. but not cured. See a rheumatologist and discuss which options (biologicals or other treatment) is appropriate in your situation. Read more...
No. Unfortunately not yet but with newer medications we are able to achieve the goal of remission much more often than decades ago. Read more...