How risky is minimally invasive spine surgery?

Depends. It depends on exactly what is being done, your surgeon's experience and training, your size and medical condition, the type of condition being treated. All surgery has risks. Mis can reduce some risks, but may increase other. Have a frank discussion with the surgeon recommending the procedure.
Small. Miss carries with it the same risks as conventional open surgery ie nerve root damage, paresis, paralysis, epidural hematoma, wound infection, pseudoarthrosis, hardware failure, ect. It has the advantage of smaller access to the site of damage, decreased scar tissue formation and quicker recovery.
Generally low. The outcomes of minimally invasive spine surgery vs open have been compared in many studies. The outcomes are generally comparable long-term. Short term advantages of minimally invasive surgeries are less blood loss, lower narcotic use, lower cost, shorter length of stay, and lower infection rates.
MIS Risk. Depending on the surgery minimally invasive spine (mis) surgery can carry the same or slightly less risk than traditional open surgery.

Related Questions

How will I know if I'm a candidate for minimally invasive spine surgery?

Depends. Minimally invasive spine surgery aims to achieve the same goals as standard surgery, just with less tissue damage. A lot depends on the actual problem and the experience of the surgeon. There is definitely a learning curve and the initial results show more complications with minimally invasive surgery. A good compromise might be "less" invasive but still maximally effective surgery. Read more...
First, by failing a . Course of non operative care and having symptoms and findings matching an imaging study that reveals a surgically correctable problem . Then see a surgeon who is well versed with both traditional spine surgical techniques as well as minimally invasive ones so that surgeon will give you unbiased opinion with the pros and cons of each and which would be best for you. Read more...
MIS Candidate. Ask your spine surgeon. If they do not perform minimally invasive spine (mis) procedures ask them for a referral to a surgeon who does. They will be able to tell you if you are a candidate. If either is an option choose the surgeon you have the most confidence in. Do not be afraid to ask questions. Read more...
If surgery is needed. There has been significant evolution of minimally invasive techniques in spine surgery over the past 15 years. The vast majority of spine disorders can currently be treated with minimally invasive techniques by an experienced surgeon. Read more...

What is minimally invasive spine surgery and how is it different from traditional spine surgery?

Speak to your doctor. I suggest you speak to the surgeon doing the procedure to ask all the details regarding the differences in those surgeries as it refers to your condition. Hope you feel better. Read more...
Varies. The use of the term minimally invasive surgery has been widely used, but varies tremendously from surgeries done through puncture sized incisions as outpatient to spinal reconstructive surgeries that may still require several days in the hospital. The term implies achieving a similar or superior surgical result as a more traditional surgery, but with a less invasive approach. Thank you. Read more...
MIS Definition. Minimally invasive spine (mis) surgery is performed through multiple small tissue openings to perform decompression of nerves, instrumentation and fusion of the spine. The treatment goals of an mis surgery are the same as traditional spine surgery but less tissue disruption occurs with mis surgery. Variations in pain and recovery depend on the extent of surgery performed. Read more...
Less Invasive. Minimally invasive spine surgery techniques treat spine disorders with minimal disruption of normal structures, particularly the back (para spinous) muscles. This is accomplished with smaller incisions, x-ray guidance, and gentle dilation of muscles instead of destructive techniques and large retractors. The overall results are the same as open spine surgeries but with much faster recovery. Read more...

Can invasive spine surgery with lots of neck and arm pain and stress on body bring on symptoms of MS or lupus? Can is allow a disease to manifest?

VERY DIFFERENT. Both ms and lupus are immune mediated inflammatory disorders, and your neck issues most likely due to degenerative or traumatic etiologies. None of these are related to each other, and in fact, your symptoms may indeed be due to post-operative complications such as scarring. An expert neurologist can readily sort out and categorize your issues, and may be worthwhile to have a consultation. Read more...