What another symptoms can vertigo cause besides for dizziness and lightheadedness?

Vomiting. Vertigo is the sensation of movement when you are not moving. For most people this causes nausea and vomiting. The sensation comes from ear and brain centers that are designed for balance and orientation. When they are off kilter we sense movement and get very disoriented. The cause may be quite complex. A thorough evaluation would be appropriate.

Related Questions

Sudden dizziness, arms felt cold, nausea, and feeling faint, so went to ER. EKG normal, chest X-ray & brain CT & blood tests ok but low potassium. Sent home. Can Low potassium cause these symptoms?

Not too likely. Potassium usually needs to be pretty low to cause dizziness, and the ECG would be abnormal in that case. The question to be answered is, why is the potassium low? Meds? Diarrhea? Endocrine problems? Thorough history and good physical exam probably has the answer. Read more...
Not likely. Your symptoms & the rapidity with which everything seems to have come on speaks in favor of what we refer to as a VASOVAGAL reaction. For some reason you suddenly had a stimulation by the Vagus Nerve of your cardiovascular system which would've dropped your blood pressure & heart rate by a fair amount. Since you were sent home from the ER I'm sure your potassium wasn't THAT LOW to be of concern. Read more...

Migraine-associated vertigo, can this cause severe lightheadedness as opposed to actual spinning or dizziness?

Sure it can. While the most traditional & specific definition of what is known as vertiginous migraine or as you say "Migraine-associated vertigo" is that of actual vertiginous sensations or spinning/whirling/tumbling/moving feeling either followed by or preceded by migraine headaches there's nothing that says that a person couldn't simply have an event of lightheadedness or disconnected feeling & headaches. Read more...

What causes lightheadedness and dizziness?

Lots of things! Sorting out the significance of those symptoms depends on accompanied circumstances (precipitating events, duration, palpitations), objective findings (abnormal cardiac or neurologic exam), age (younger, older), etc. Often these may be relatively benign (if younger patient and not objective abnormalities), but may also be a harbinger of more serious underlying conditions. Talk to your doctor. Read more...
Vertigo. If drug side effect is excluded, far more common cause of feeling of one or more of lightheadedness, spinning, tilting, falling, losing balance is vertigo. Diagnostic difficulty occurs when symptoms are mild. Expensive cardiac work up is often done. Many a times some cardiac abnormality e.G bradycardia or severe carotid stenosis is found and treated but dizziness persists until vertigo is treated. Read more...

Dizziness and lightheadedness, what could be the cause?

Numerous. Many, many, many possible causes. It is far to complex a subject to answer in this limited forum. Best to discuss with your doctor. Read more...
Not enough info. Need more information to figure this out. What makes it better or worse ? Have you seen a doctor about this yet? Read more...

Sudden lightheadedness, dizziness confusion after breaking finger. What causes that sensation?

Hyperventilation. Breaking a finger is a sudden and painful occurrence. It is likely that at that time you hyperventilated for a while causing the lightheadedness dizziness and confusion. It should have all subsided when you had a chance to relax and have someone take care of your finger. Read more...

With my indiopathic intercranial hypertension I have all usual SX plus dizziness and lightheadedness, could a drusen cause this?

Drusen. does not cause idiopathic intracranial HTN. Dizziness and lightheadedness are not typical symptoms of pseudo-tumor. (Positional headache and blurred vision are.) Diamox, Topamax, (topiramate) Zonegran, optic nerve fenestration and elimination of causative factors are treatments. Avoid tetracycline, excessive vitamin A, lead and steroids,. Make sure you are not iron deficient or overweight. Read more...
Unrelated. Drusen are small globules of protein within the substance of the optic nerve at the disc which cause the appearance of papilledema (swelling from increased intracranial pressure) sort of like pillows piled under a sheet. They are completely unrelated to idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although you can have both simultaneously--making the optic nerve appear very enlarged. Read more...