Is walking a good form of exercise for people with spinal stenosis?

Depends. Walking may increase spinal stenosis symptoms because the spine tends to be in a more extended position with walking. If walking causes symptoms, patients may consider biking, where the spine is more flexed.
Yes . It can be if your symptoms allow for it. You may need to walk uphill or on a treadmill that adjusts for an incline as this causes you to lean a little forward which will open up your lower back spinal canal to a degree.
Yes. Yes, it is ok to walk and try to stay as active as possible. That being said, walking does tend to aggravate the symptoms of spinal stenosis to variable degrees.

Related Questions

How can I possibly exercise with 3 pinched nerves from spinal stenosis prevents me from even walking?

Physiatrist help. You need to consult a physiatrist or get a physical therapy referral for creation of a plan that can help you with this. Read more...
Sitting. Pain from spinal stenosis if often made worse with standing or walking. Sitting is usually tolerated better. This would allow you to use a recumbent bike for cardiovascular exercise. I would also recommend physical therapy so they can teach you proper positioning of the core and spine to help elevate pain. That is a good first step to moving on to an exercise program. Read more...
Diet/surgery. Swimming might help. If overweight, reducing diet can help. Otherwise you might need surgery to decompress the nerves and the cord. Read more...
Spinal stenosis. Patients with spinal stenosis typically have a condition called neurogenic claudication that prevents them from standing straight and walking long distances. Bending forward typically opens up the canal and these patients can often be found leaning against a shopping cart at the grocery store. Core strengthening exercises can help support the spine and minimize pressure on your neural elements. Read more...

I walk a lot; is this bad if you have spinal stenosis?

No. Walking with spinal stenosis can cause pain, but nit is important to continue with regular exercise. Once the symptoms interfere with acceptable levels of activity and diminish quality of life because of pain, you may need to explore surgical options. Read more...
No. Exercise is helpful for any chronically painful condition. You will not make ss worse by exercising. However, if it causes you pain, cut back on the duration. You should never exercise to the point of pain. Read more...

Is walking okay for spinal stenosis patients?

OK - but not enough. Walking is ok - (better than sitting around). Walking however does not really increase back muscle strength (no challenge to the muscles, you are not going to get a bigger biceps from walking either). To significantly strengthen the para-spinous muscles (thereby reducing strain on the spinal column), isometric exercises e.g. Swimming, bicycle, rowing machine, yoga) are preferred to just walking. Read more...
Walking OK. Walking is an excellent exercise and is encouraged. Unfortunately, patients with lumbar spinal stenosis may experience pain radiating down the buttocks, into the hips and thighs and possibly to the lower legs. This is called neurogenic claudication and may respond to decompressive lumbar laminectomy. Read more...
Yes. For spinal stenosis patients, walking is ok but maybe more difficult. Neurogenic claudication (buttock and leg pain/weakness) from spinal stenosis is often positional. Symptoms are typically worse when standing because the spine is extended, resulting in slightly more stenosis. Exercises where the spine is flexed, such as biking, typically lessen symptoms and may be more comfortable. Read more...
Yes. Yes, it is ok to walk and try to stay as active as possible. That being said, walking does tend to aggravate the symptoms of spinal stenosis to variable degrees. Read more...

How can I prepare my body (I'm 68) for a long 9 hour flight and 15 days of walking tours when I have Spinal stenosis. When I overdo walking, I suffer?

Spinal stenosis. That is a difficult task. Lumbar spinal stenosis causes back and leg pain with walking (neurogenic claudication). Fortunately most walking tours have frequent stops to discuss what you are viewing. Take a cane that folds out into a small stool so you can sit and flex your back to decompress the pinched nerves. Do stretches in the morning and evening. Add ice to the back at night. . Read more...
Start Training Now. Start with core strengthening exercises, also see if you can tolerate increased sitting and walking times. without pain. lastly you mint want to get an injections like epidural steroid or even facet joint injections to help with the pain while you are gone. Read more...

Spinal stenosis for 2 yrs.. have developed slight bladder and bowel leakage. Lots of trouble walking. Wondering if it is worse.

Spinal stenosis. Yes you are describing what is termed "neurogenic claudication" - this means the stenosis is getting worse. I would see a back surgeon for further evaluation. Read more...
Be seen. I would just recommend you get checked for it. It is not real common, but severe cases of spinal stenosis can cause a condition known as cauda equine syndrome in which bowel and bladder incontinence can occur. Surgery is usually a consideration in those patients. Read more...
Urgent. Though it is not an emergency situation, this problem needs to be addressed very soon. There is worsening pressure on the spinal cord. You need to see a spine surgeon. Read more...

85 yr fem-sharp intermit pain in both thighs, occurring after sitting or walking too long. Has spinal stenosis. On warfarin-3.75MG/day Possible cause?

Physical Exam Needed. This is a complex question. A physical exam is very helpful in a case like this. I wish I could be more helpful but I want to you get the right diagnosis. Please arrange for a physical exam with a doctor. Read more...

I had an operation for spinal stenosis 2 years ago and now my legs are having sharp pain down to the knee. It's very painful to stand or walk.

You. Need to get back into your primary doctor to have a neurological exam done. Read more...
Post-laminectomy. Considering a history of a 360 spinal fusion, i would recommend a follow-up evaluation with your surgeon. Depending on how everything healed, there can develop issues above/below the surgery that can cause such complaints. There can also be non-spinal origins to the pain, so make sure that your sacroiliac, hip, and knee joints are also evaluated. Read more...