8 doctors weighed in:

What's done for sleep apnea?

8 doctors weighed in
Dr. John Feola
Internal Medicine
2 doctors agree

In brief: R/O OSA

OSA can be suggested by history and physical.
Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL.

In brief: R/O OSA

OSA can be suggested by history and physical.
Excess snoring/daytime sleepiness/apneic episodes/ aM headaches. And the Exam obesity/small oral airway/collar size>18. The definitive test is a PSG with split night/CPAP titration. I would request copy of sleep study and get a second opinion if you are not satisfied with the options. You are young CPAP can be difficult to tolerate. ENT FOR UPP EVAL.
Thank
Dr. Steven Bender
Dentistry
2 doctors agree

In brief: Apnea

There are three ways in which to keep the airway open during sleep; positive pressure (cpap), oral appliances, and tracheotomy.
CPAP is the most effective treatment but compliance is about 50%. Many studies show that oral appliances are as effective as CPAP in mild to moderate cases and the compliance is much higher.

In brief: Apnea

There are three ways in which to keep the airway open during sleep; positive pressure (cpap), oral appliances, and tracheotomy.
CPAP is the most effective treatment but compliance is about 50%. Many studies show that oral appliances are as effective as CPAP in mild to moderate cases and the compliance is much higher.
Thank
Dr. Evan Altman
Psychiatry
2 doctors agree

In brief: Treatment

Obstructive sleep apnea, which is the most common form, usually occurs when there is a temporary obstruction in the pathway between the mouth & lungs during sleep.
To correct the problem, treatments include: continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and sometimes bipap or others, stimulant medications such as provigil, Nuvigil etc, surgical interventions to correct the obstruction. See your doc.

In brief: Treatment

Obstructive sleep apnea, which is the most common form, usually occurs when there is a temporary obstruction in the pathway between the mouth & lungs during sleep.
To correct the problem, treatments include: continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and sometimes bipap or others, stimulant medications such as provigil, Nuvigil etc, surgical interventions to correct the obstruction. See your doc.
Thank
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