7 doctors weighed in:
Is there an exercise to reduce or relieve spinal stenosis?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. Stan Lee
Orthopedic Surgery - Spine
2 doctors agree
In brief: Yes
Spinal stenosis symptoms arise from pressure on the spinal nerves from spinal canal narrowing.
Flexion exercises of the lumbar spine may help decompress the pressure and reduce symptoms. Core and spinal extensor exercises may help build up muscles that support the spine.

In brief: Yes
Spinal stenosis symptoms arise from pressure on the spinal nerves from spinal canal narrowing.
Flexion exercises of the lumbar spine may help decompress the pressure and reduce symptoms. Core and spinal extensor exercises may help build up muscles that support the spine.
Dr. Stan Lee
Dr. Stan Lee
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Dr. Craig Morton
Physical & Rehabilitation Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Try planks
Planks are an exercise move that can strengthen the core while maintaining a neutral spine.
You can perform this by getting into a push up position and holding this position or get on your elbows while keeping your belly off of the floor.

In brief: Try planks
Planks are an exercise move that can strengthen the core while maintaining a neutral spine.
You can perform this by getting into a push up position and holding this position or get on your elbows while keeping your belly off of the floor.
Dr. Craig Morton
Dr. Craig Morton
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Dr. Edward Hellman
Orthopedic Surgery
In brief: Not really
Exercise is in general is good, but it really does not do much for the condition of spinal stenosis.
Somewhat similar in thought process to exercise not really doing a lot for a severely arthritic knee.

In brief: Not really
Exercise is in general is good, but it really does not do much for the condition of spinal stenosis.
Somewhat similar in thought process to exercise not really doing a lot for a severely arthritic knee.
Dr. Edward Hellman
Dr. Edward Hellman
Thank
Dr. Thomas Dowling
Orthopedic Surgery - Spine
In brief: Yes
Exercises emphasizing a decrease in the sway of your back or lordosis and what are called williams flexion exercises may help.
About 15% get worse, 15% get better over time and the rest remain the same.

In brief: Yes
Exercises emphasizing a decrease in the sway of your back or lordosis and what are called williams flexion exercises may help.
About 15% get worse, 15% get better over time and the rest remain the same.
Dr. Thomas Dowling
Dr. Thomas Dowling
Thank
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