What can be the side effects of prostate cancer treatment?

Depends. 1. Confined to prostate - options include surgery, radiation, and radiation seeds/similar. 2. Prostate cancer spread - Lupron (leuprolide) injections, casodex, taxotere are usually initial treatments. Side effects of all these treatments varies. I would suggest a conversation with your oncologist or urologist regarding the recommended treatment and options.
RT side effects. The main short term side effects from external radiotherapy to the prostate are bladder inflammation, diarrhea, sore skin in the genital area andloss of pubic hair long term side effects include: inflammation of the rectal passage (proctitis) and bleeding., frequent, loose bowel movements, problems passing urine erection problems (impotence) and risk of hip fractures.

Related Questions

I've survived prostate cancer for 5 years now after radiation treatment, but with the usual side effects. Is it harmful to masterbate?

No, please enjoy. There is no reason not to masturbate, and healthy to have the urge. Is there any chance you might find or have a partner, that might be better. Read more...
No. No evidence to say yes. Also, we are assuming the cancer is gone. Just do routine psa checks and you should be alright. Read more...

What is a calypso prostate cancer treatment?

Pin point radiation. This a specific system to guide radiation. A kind of radio guidance system is used to aim the radiation beam more accurately. Read more...
Calypso. Calypso is a gps signaling method that allows radiation oncologists to more accurately give radiation treatment to the prostate by monitoring the location of the prostate gland in real time. A urologist places a rice kernel sized electromagnetic transmitter into the prostate that helps the radiation oncologist monitor the location ofthe prostate during treatment. Read more...

How can I know if prostate cancer treatment has helped?

Follow up. For prostate cancer post treatment is usually with serial psa's and imaging tests such as ultrasound or mri. Also depends on your symptoms too. Consult with your urologist or oncologist for details. Read more...
Exam and PSA test. Patients should have digital rectal exams (DRE) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing regularly after surgery and radiation therapy. After surgery (robotic or open radical prostatectomy) the PSA should go to undetectable levels (0). After radiation the PSA generally falls gradually to low or very low levels. Read more...

Does the nhs pay for any prostate cancer treatment at all?

Yes. NHS is the National Health Service in the UK. As far as I know (my sister has been in England for 40 yrs) NHS pays for healthcare of all British citizens. Unless you are referring to something else by nhs??? Read more...

Did there been a breakthrough in prostate cancer treatment?

Pca. New robotic surgical techniques could be argued as a breakthrough, but the big issue is psa. While not a great test it has reduced the # of men presenting with advanced stage disease. That is a breakthrough ! Read more...

What about prostate cancer treatment? What kinds of issues should I think about when choosing a treatment?

Quality of life. Fortunately with early screening (psa, digital rectal exam) prostate cancer is found in early stages for many men. This typically leaves men with many options for treatment. I would recommend considering all treatment options and paying close attention to potential side effects that may be associated with each treatment. There is no one size fits all treatment. Read more...
Quality of life. Please see my response about a very similar question. Read more...
Side effects. In early stage prostate cancer all treatments are equal, so the question is what are the possibilities of the lasting permanent side effect. The two that men worry about is incontinence and impotence. Look up the percentage of these as well as bladder and rectal issues to help guide your decision. Read more...
Several factors. There are a number of factors that one should consider in the treatment of prostate cancer. The first is whether or nor the cancer needs treatment as many are slow growing. So, you need to consider the psa level, gleason score, and stage of the cancer. You also need to consider your age, personal health, personal wishes, and the potential side effects of each treatment. Read more...
Medical Treatment. For localized prostate ca, the treatment is local(make sense): radiation or surgery cures most(again depending on risk). For late stages, the treatment is more complicated, particularly for those "asymptomatic" patients, those with a rising psa despite of hormonal therapy. No standard answears, but I have used a variety of therapies, including "alternative" therapy. However, all are anectodal, no. Read more...
Beware of "new" And "improved" technology, that in fact is high cost and has limited long term follow up about late effects. Both surgical methods and radiotherapy suffer from the technical enthusiasm that lacks proven patient benefit. Just because it is high tech does not make it better. Most gleason 6 or less; psa 4 or less can be "watched and waited". Read more...
Informed decision. I begin most consults for low to intermediate risk prostate cancer patients discussing how the most stressful aspect about the diagnosis is trying to figure out what if anything should be done about it. The previous answers are all correct. I'd only add to remember that you are your best advocate and ultimate decision maker. Be sure that you have been presented with all standard options, pros&cons. Read more...

What will my father do with the side effects from his prostate cancer?

Discuss with his Dr. Your father or you should address this to his urologist, oncologist or radiotherapist. There are many sequelae of prostate cancer, such as pain, and urinary syptoms. All can and should be addressed by his drs. Read more...