13 doctors weighed in:
What are alternative treatments for sciatica besides painkillers?
13 doctors weighed in

Dr. Qamar Khan
Pain Management
4 doctors agree
In brief: Pinched Nerve
Sounds like you have a pinched nerve in your back.
I would suggest seeing a pain/spine specialist to evaluate you further to evaluate what level and what can be done to treat you. There are interventional treatments besides medications and surgeries that might reduce or eliminate the pain altogether.

In brief: Pinched Nerve
Sounds like you have a pinched nerve in your back.
I would suggest seeing a pain/spine specialist to evaluate you further to evaluate what level and what can be done to treat you. There are interventional treatments besides medications and surgeries that might reduce or eliminate the pain altogether.
Dr. Qamar Khan
Dr. Qamar Khan
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3 comments
Dr. Lisa Piccione
Sciatic nerve pain can result from the nerve being pinched in the back or at the SI jnctn. The cause of the pinch determines the treatment. Although surgery is an option, under most cicumstances, the issue can be addressed by a good physical therapist. I advise you to see you PCP first to determine the next appropriate step.
Dr. Heidi Fowler
Acupuncture can be very helpful in treating Sciatic pain. However, it will not cure underlying pathology.
Dr. Will Moorehead
Orthopedic Surgery - Spine
3 doctors agree
In brief: Time
Given time the symptoms will gradually decrease.
During that waiting period, you may try heat application to the back or cold packs to the same. Performing stretching exercises may also be beneficial. As the pain begin to resolve your exercise program can increase in intensity. You may use stabilizing ball to assist in performing core strengthening exercises. Pilates and yoga can be helpful.

In brief: Time
Given time the symptoms will gradually decrease.
During that waiting period, you may try heat application to the back or cold packs to the same. Performing stretching exercises may also be beneficial. As the pain begin to resolve your exercise program can increase in intensity. You may use stabilizing ball to assist in performing core strengthening exercises. Pilates and yoga can be helpful.
Dr. Will Moorehead
Dr. Will Moorehead
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Dr. Robert McMurtrie
Pain Management
2 doctors agree
In brief: See pain specialist
Each person needs to be evaluated on an individual basis.
There can be several reasons for "sciatica" or pain down the leg. Lumbar disc inflammation with or without nerve impingment, facet joint irritation, sacroiliac joint irritation, piriformis syndrome. A thorough physical exam and diagnostic studies will help determine what treatment will be best depending on your diagnosis.

In brief: See pain specialist
Each person needs to be evaluated on an individual basis.
There can be several reasons for "sciatica" or pain down the leg. Lumbar disc inflammation with or without nerve impingment, facet joint irritation, sacroiliac joint irritation, piriformis syndrome. A thorough physical exam and diagnostic studies will help determine what treatment will be best depending on your diagnosis.
Dr. Robert McMurtrie
Dr. Robert McMurtrie
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1 comment
Dr. Johnnie Strickland Jr
definitely get checked out; but to answer your questions there are plenty of Herbal anti-inflammatories that might provide some pain relief such as Cats Claw. i also find it pain relieving to drink alkalinized water and stop putting Acid and toxins in through the diet whcih tend to be inflammatory in nature as well. see my weebsite at www.MedacPC.com
Dr. Jimmy Bowen
Physical & Rehabilitation Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Sciatica
Meds, exercise, physical therapy including mckenzie centralization techniques, traction, inversion table.
Many things are used.

In brief: Sciatica
Meds, exercise, physical therapy including mckenzie centralization techniques, traction, inversion table.
Many things are used.
Dr. Jimmy Bowen
Dr. Jimmy Bowen
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Dr. Kevin Teal
Neurosurgery
In brief: Activity adjustments
Cold or heat can be used to help with any associated back pain.
Motrin or other anti-inflammatory can help with pain without narcotics. Walking or swimming can help you remain active without aggravating the pain hopefully. Physical therapy can add ultrasound and stretching exercises. For pain that lasts more than 6 weeks, or weakness, or incontinence, see your doctor and get Lumbar MRI.

In brief: Activity adjustments
Cold or heat can be used to help with any associated back pain.
Motrin or other anti-inflammatory can help with pain without narcotics. Walking or swimming can help you remain active without aggravating the pain hopefully. Physical therapy can add ultrasound and stretching exercises. For pain that lasts more than 6 weeks, or weakness, or incontinence, see your doctor and get Lumbar MRI.
Dr. Kevin Teal
Dr. Kevin Teal
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