Is dental sealants good or bad?

Sealants. Are a great tool to prevent decay on the biting surfaces of the teeth where the grooves are. However, they must be properly maintained and replaced as necessary. Most sealants last 2-3 years.
Good. Dental sealants help reduce the chance of a child getting cavities on the chewing surface of their permanent molars by about 80%. While they may need to get touched up every few years they are easy to place and cost effective .
Good. Sealants fill in deep narrow grooves in teeth that are difficult to clean and prone to cavities. Placing a sealant will keep food and bacteria out of these grooves and help prevent decay.
PREVENTION . Every one gets cavities. Done properly, sealants are a great way to prevent cavities.
Good Idea. Dental sealants help reduce the risk of developing cavities on the biting surfaces of teeth.

Related Questions

Can uneven dental sealants cause bad jaw alignment. I think I feel my jaw trying to accommodate to a too high dental sealant, should I be concerned?

See your dentist. for adjustment. When a dental sealant is too high in the bite, the jaw does not close properly and it causes further pressure to the TMJ area leaving the muscle unable to relax and in contraction. Can cause the TM disorder. Simple adjustment will solve the problem. Read more...
Yes. Having a filling/sealant/crown, etc. too high in bite is like having a rock in your shoe. If the irritant is not removed, you will not get used to it. You may end up with TMJ/TMD issues. Read more...
High spot. a high spot on a sealant or restoration can throw the bite off and the result is patient dependent some will notice it more then others, some adapt to it others dont. best to have the dentist who placed them check the bite and adjust it accordingly. Read more...

What are dental sealants?

Dental Sealants. Dental sealants are flowable resins (similar to composite fillings) that are used to cover defective pits and fissures on teeth to make them less likely to develop cavities in those areas only. Read more...
Cavity preventers. Posterior permanent teeth have deep grooves and crevices on the chewing surface. This is the most common area to get a cavity on these teeth. Dental sealants are a composite material that is flowed into these areas to make them "shallow valleys" so food and bacteria can't get stuck in these grooves, thus making it harder to get a cavity. Sealants are cost effective and easy for the patient. Read more...
Whats a sealant. A sealant is a bonded resin coating placed to cover ("seal") the grooves and pits found on back teeth where 60% of decay originates. These are typically placed on children but can be used on adults who do not have these areas filled but are cavity prone. Read more...
Protective shield. that are applied to the grooves on of the back teeth to protect them from tooth decay. Also known as fissure sealants. Read more...

What do dental sealants do?

Prevent decay. Sealants seal the deep crevices on the biting surfaces of molar teeth in order to prevent decay. Read more...
Seals the grooves. Our teeth have natural grooves that assist in the chewing process. On a microscopic level, there can be very deep grooves that can be difficult to keep clean and decay easily. Sealants fill in these smaller grooves to keep them more decay free. Read more...
Cavity prevention. Posterior permanent teeth have deep grooves and crevices on the chewing surface. This is the most common area to get a cavity on these teeth. Dental sealants are a composite material that is flowed into these areas to make them "shallow valleys" so food and bacteria can't get stuck in these grooves, thus making it harder to get a cavity. Sealants are cost effective and easy for the patient. Read more...
Decrease Decay. Dental sealants help reduce the risk of developing cavities on the biting surfaces of teeth. Read more...
What are they. sealants are resins used to fill in the pits and fissures (grooves) on back teeth which is where 60% of tooth decay on these teeth occur. as these grooves are often narrower then a toothbrush bristle they can not be cleaned of the bacteria that lead to tooth decay a sealant fills these in allowing the patient to clean these and decrease decay potential. Read more...
Dental sealants. Dental sealants act as a plastic barrier to prevent cavities. Read more...

Who should get dental sealants?

Anyone. Generally speaking, sealants are used in children. However, they are beneficial in adults as well...If the adult patient is at high risk for tooth decay. Sealants work by filling in the deep grooves in the teeth, thus taking away "hiding places" for plaque bacteria which cause cavities. Read more...
Children. Sealants are indicated in children shortly after molar or premolar teeth erupts. Sealants can only be placed on pristine tooth surface with no staining or decay. Adults often also get sealants, but they are most important in children. Read more...
Anyone can. Sealants are most effective at protecting the chewing surfaces of children's new permanent molars from tooth decay as these teeth are the most vulnerable .Because children's mouths are smaller it is harder for them to brush these teeth well. Also children's diets often contain more high carbohydrate snacks then adults. Adults who are at high risk for decay can also benefit from sealants as well. Read more...
Everyone. Anyone who would like to decrease the chance of developing cavities on the biting surfaces of their teeth. Read more...

Are dental sealants supposed to last?

Usually, not always. Dental sealants usually last, but not always. Some just come out (within a few days of being placed), other times they come out with sticky foods or candies. Some types of sealant "wash" away so they be in the depths of the pits and fissures of the tooth, but we don't see them. Dental sealants should be checked every 6 months to make sure they are still there. Read more...
It varies. It is dependent upon the chewing habits of the person. Read more...
Sealants depend. The length of time a dental sealant lasts depends on the anatomy of the tooth being sealed and the occlusion of the patient. Teeth with deep pits and fissures retain sealants better than teeth with shallow pits and fissures. Also, if the patient has heavy occlusion, this will cause ware and dislodging of the sealants. Read more...
Sealants wear. The sealant material is softer then natural tooth and can slowly wear away over time. If your tooth needs to be resealed the dentist doesn't need to remove the old sealant because natural wear and tear has already done that. New sealant can be applied right on top of any remaining old sealant. Depending on your diet sealants can last 7-10 years. Read more...
Depends. Sealants should last about 3-5 years before the need to be replaced or redone. Read more...
NO! Just a temp fix! It has been my experience that dental implants don't last very long. Most dentist don't adequately clean the tooth (via light air abrasion), etch for the required period of time of effectively isolate the site from contaminating moisture. And .. Even when all of this is done correctly, stick foods can still remove the thin layer of plastic sealants. A minimally invasive filling might be best! Read more...

What is used to make dental sealants?

Almost white filling. Technically it's called an unfilled resin, aka plastic but....You should think of it as a soft white filling used to reduce the risk of getting a cavity on that surface of the tooth. Generally used on children ages 6 and up. Read more...
Dental sealants . Sealants are made from a resin or acrylic that is bonded to an etched tooth surface. This material can be made of bpa. Read more...
In short, plastics. Sealants are bonded to small discrepancies in teeth before they can decay. All bonded materials are plastic resins. Sealants are low-viscosity resins, thus they can flow into, and seal, these discrepancies. Think of sealants like wrapping a tooth in saran wrap. The brands I use are BPA-free. Read more...

Do dental sealants change if you grind?

Usually no. . The sealants are in the grooves of the teeth. If someone grinds their teeth they are usually not grinding the grooves of the teeth. If they are grinding the tooth that much, some sort of dental treatment is needed. Read more...
Yes, they will wear. Dental sealants are softer than tooth enamel so if you grind your teeth, the top of the sealant will wear away. However, the sealant will stay in the depths of the pits and fissures of the tooth. Read more...
Yes. The grinding action of your teeth will wear away sealants and they may need to be replaced. Read more...

What are the benefits of dental sealants?

Prevents decay. Sealants are commonly done for children on their molars to seal the fissures (valleys) on the tops of the teeth. This helps to prevent decay in these areas. It is not usually done on adults but if you desire this, you should consult your dentist. Read more...
Reduces decay. Dental sealants reduce the incidence of dental decay on the top (occlusal portion) of the molar teeth. Read more...
Prevention. Sealants prevent cavities. Usually sealants are placed on the top of the back teeth. They can be the molars in toddlers or when the adult premolars and molars have just erupted fully. Read more...
Cavity Reduction. Dental sealants help reduce the risk of developing cavities on the biting surfaces of teeth. Read more...
Cavity Preventers. Posterior permanent teeth have deep grooves and crevices on the chewing surface. This is the most common area to get a cavity on these teeth. Dental sealants are a composite material that is flowed into these areas to make them "shallow valleys" so food and bacteria can't get stuck in these grooves, thus making it harder to get a cavity. Sealants are cost effective and easy for the patient. Read more...

Could dental sealants change how you bite?

Yes... Sealants can make it feel "different" when you bite down. Give it a week and everything should feel fine. If not, call your dentist. Read more...
Sealants. Sealants, if not properly finished could cause an interference in your bite. If they are too large, they may need to be adjusted. A very simple procedure. Read more...
They should NOT. If placed properly sealants, fillings, crowns, etc. ANY dental work should leave your bite the way it was BEFORE the procedure was completed. I would have it adjusted if it feels off. Read more...
Yes, it is possible. Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings, which are applied to the chewing surface to prevent occlusal decay. A change in the way your teeth fit together when you bite may indicate that excessive material was placed on the surface. See your dentist for an easy adjustment. Read more...
Yes. Yes if not done well. If you note this, see DDS who will reduce thickness of sealant. See DDS for any tooth pain which may be due to dental decay. Read more...