Related Questions

What bone leg is involved during a hip replacement?

Femur. The top of the femur is the ball in the hip joint (which is a ball in socket joint. Read more...
Pelvis and femur. The hip socket is part of the pelvis and is fitted with a metal shell during a hip replacement. Usually a plastic liner goes inside the shell as the artificial cartilage replacement. The ball portion of the hip joint is the uppermost end of the femur. It is replaced with a metal ball during the procedure, which is attached to a metal implant that is secured a few inches into the femur. Read more...

Upper front thigh area is causing great pain. From front of thigh down threw shin bone area. Was in severe car accident 10 years ago need a hip replacement on right leg. Have bruising, twisting, pulling kind of pain. Located on upper front thigh shooting do

As . As with most pain conditions, there can be a variety of potential problems that can cause the pain that you are describing. It is difficult to diagnose with the short description given and without a proper physical examination. Pain is often a sign of inflammation. Inflammation often occurs when something is irritated. Irritation occurs from a variety of different things. If the pain does not improve, you should see someone who is qualified to make an appropriate diagnosis. This could be nerve related. As always, i would highly suggest you do your research when seeking medical help. Find a physician who meets, or even better, exceeds the basic qualifications to practice in their specific field or sub-specialty. Read more...
Hip replacement. Your symptoms sound like your hip replacement prosthesis may be the problem. It could be loose, could be bone/metal fracture or infection. You need to see an orthopedic doctor and get some xrays and blood work done. Read more...

Is it possible to grow bone back to avoid having a knee or hip replacement?

No. Bone is not the problem, arthritis is caused by a loss of cartilage covering the bone. Cartilage is that smooth shiny stuff on the end of the bone like you see on a drumstick at the joint. We have many procedures to reproduce it in small amounts or repair it if only small areas are lost or damaged, but when there is more exposed bone than cartilage, hip or knee replacement becomes necessary. Read more...
No. The problem is worn out cartilage. The bone only becomes worn out later in the disease. Neither can be replaced well with natural tissue right now. Read more...
Cartilage transplant. It is possible to replace the meniscus cartilage and perform a stem cell paste graft for many patients who have been told they need a knee replacement. This is called a biologic knee replacement. Read more...

Father had titanium hip replacement last year, now may require imaging of shoulder bone, which has lump on it. Would MRI be allowed given titanium hip?

MRI COMPATIBLE. Titanium implants are MRI compatible. People with nontitanium implants should inform the radiologist or technician prior to the procedure; however, most joint implants are firmly attached inside bone and will not pose a serious problem. People with internal metallic surgical staples from healed surgeries should also inform the radiologist or technician prior to the procedure. Read more...

I have leg calve perthes had surgery when I was 10 now in a lot of pain seems hip replacement is option but I'm only 24 what other options are there?

Therapy first. Long term consequence of perthe's disease include hip dysplasia and arthritis of the hip. Due to your age you should start with therapy and activity modification. Depending on the extent of the dysplasia your surgical options include femoral osteotomy, acetabular osteotomy and hip resurfacing or replacement! you should see your orthopaedic surgeon! Read more...
Three options. I can think of at least three other options: 1)osteoplasty-removing a prominent bump if present; 2)osteotomy-cutting and realigning the femoral head to take pressure off a worn area; 3)femoral head resurfacing-covering the ball part of the joint with a metal cap if the cartilage is all worn out. Your current anatomy as evaluated by xray +/- MRI would determine the proper procedure to choose. Read more...
Probably the best. It is a good option, but not a great one since it lasts for about 20 years and you're so young. Another option is a hip fusion, which sounds extreme, but it can be converted to a total hip at a later time. Read more...