Best dental appliance for sleep apnea and grinding?

One for both. Research has shown that a device that positions the lower jaw forward while sleeping as is used for snoring and sleep apnea, also reduces sleep bruxism episodes. This is the only type of oral device that will actually reduce the number of bruxism events. Other dvices for bruxsim will protect the teeth and in some instances, decrease the intensity of the muscle contractions seen in bruxism.
No best appliance. There are over 70 different types of appliances for sleep apnea. The appliances are most effective for patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea. Seeing a dentist with significant experience and education in delivering these appliances can help the patient decide which appliance to use and improve the success rate. They can also help with the grinding.
It depends. I would recommend that you see a dentist who has been trained in sleep medicine. There are literally dozens of different sleep appliances out there. Each one is made for a unique situation. For example, some allow more freedom of movement for grinders, etc. An appropriately trained sleep medicine dentist would be able to evaluate you and determine which appliance would be best for you.
Best device to date. Is a somnodent mas or a respire. Both appliances act to prevent the jaw from moving backward (collapsing) during sleep. But, the parts are not physically connected so the patient can move the jaw freely forward and to the side. In addition, because the working parts are on the side, the patient can lick their lips--very important to us apnea sufferers. An anterior component can minimize grinding.
Individuality. There is no one "best" dental appliance for sleep apnea or grinding. I make different types of mouthpieces based upon my history and examination. Some patients just need a soft, thin mouthguard to wear at night, while others may need a hard acrylic one that they wear 24/7. Some come into my office with a handful of old appliances. Need to figure out what works and what did not.
NTI device for grind. The key is to wear something that prevents your chewing muscles from being able to clench or bite down. A traditional full mouth guard helps to protect your teeth but can still allow clenching and grinding on the guard. An nti device fits on the front teeth, is small and when worn prevents the back teeth from coming together helping your jaw joint to rest. A skilled dentist can fit them for you.

Related Questions

What are the best dental appliance for sleep apnea?

Sleep Apnea. There are several types of oral appliances for sleep apnea depending on what the dentist uses. First it is extremely important to use a dentist that has special training in sleep apnea. Most of these appliances position the lower jaw slightly forward of the closed position, which keeps the airway open. It is important to use an appliance that is adjustable. I recommend and use the ema appliance. Read more...
No best. My practice is limited to dental sleep medicine and I have found there is no best appliance. Each has advantages and disadvantages. The best thing to do is to work with a dentist with lots of experience in this field and have them work with you to select an appliance that best fits your mouth. Many, but not all of those dentists are certified by the american board of dental sleep medicine. Read more...

Can a dental appliance help sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea. A CPAP is the treatment of choice for sleep apnea. However, many people either don't like that apparatus, can't wear it or won't wear it. It is also difficult to travel with. An oral appliance fitted by a trained dentist can keep the airway open to eliminate sleep apnea. The appliance worn inside the mouth positions the lower jaw slightly forward thus keeping the airway open. It also stops snoring. Read more...
Yes. The recommendation from the american academy of sleep medicine for mild or moderate sleep apnea is CPAP or an oral appliance. For severe sleep apnea the recommendation is try CPAP first and only use an oral appliance if you can nit tolerate the cpap. The dentist must be experienced in treating osa. Read more...
Absolutely! According to 2006 american academy of sleep medicine practice parameters, oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea who prefer them over CPAP and should be completed by a dentist with advanced training in sleep medicine. Read more...

Sleep apnea - was just told to use the dental appliance. When can I expect it to get better?

Immediately. According to 2006 american academy of sleep medicine practice parameters, oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea who prefer them over CPAP and should be completed by a dentist with advanced training in sleep medicine. Followup psg testing should be done by sleep physician to give objective evidence of effectiveness. Read more...
Depends. Usually if you have been recommended a dental sleep appliance, you probably have a mils form of sleep apnea. Mouthpieces are very effective and not as cumbersome as a CPAP machine- even though, the CPAP is the gold standard of treatment. There a re many mouthpieces out there. I recommend that you possibly get more than one opinion, but do not get one online or at a drug store! Read more...
Sleep study. Sleep apnea requires a sleep study for diagnosis. If you have not had a sleep study the "diagnosis" is invalid...See your physician for referral. If you have had sleep study with diagnosis of sleep apnea, ask you physician if you require CPAP or a less invasive treatment, such as a jaw repositioning device. Know that jaw repositioning devices can, over time, cause malocclusion. Read more...

How well do dental appliances for sleep apnea work? I have sleep apnea, and my doctor told me to see my dentist in order to get fitted for an oral appliance. How well do these work to stop problems with snoring and breathing? .

To . To provide an accurate answer to your question it would be helpful to know the results of your sleep study, in particular the ahi, and suspected location of your obstruction. Oral appliances are not helpful if you have an obstruction at the higher levels of your airway. Read more...
There . There is no one treatment that works for everyone but oral appliance can be very effective. Like most treatments for sleep apnea, there are potential short and long term negative side effects. You would be served well by seeing an experienced dentist that specializes in sleep dentistry to discuss pros and cons of oral appliance therapy and also an otolarynoglogist who specializes in sleep surgery to perform a detailed upper airway examination to help guide you on your treatment options. Read more...
I . I have had tremendous success treating sleep apnea with oral appliances. While they say it should be used for mild to moderate cases (ahi from 5 to 29) I have had cases much higher than that come down to virtually zero. It is important to seek care from someone trained and experienced, as sometimes the appliance takes the snoring away but leaves the apnea, a dangerous situation. Kent smith is near you and is great. Read more...
Can work well. They can be very effective at treating obstructive sleep apnea. The keys are seeing how severe the sleep apnea is, the type of appliance used, and where the obstruction is located. Seeing a dentist with significant experience and education in delivering these appliances can help determine the success of the appliance. Read more...
Can work well. Individual results vary. The american academy of sleep medicine recommends these appliances for people with mild or moderate apnea or who have tried CPAP and have failed. There is a new technology called matrx that can test you in a sleep center and show if an oral appliance will help you or not. Read more...
Very Well. A custom appliance made by a trained dentist will work very well for mild to moderate and even some severe apnea cases. Given that most people are more compliant with an appliance as opposed to positive pressure machines, they are a very good alternative. Read more...
Very well! According to 2006 american academy of sleep medicine practice parameters, oral appliances are indicated for use in patients with mild or moderate obstructive sleep apnea who prefer them over CPAP and should be completed by a dentist with advanced training in sleep medicine. Read more...