What physical therapy exercises should I do after a shoulder dislocation?

Rotator cuff/scapula. Rotaor cuff strengthening and scapular stabilizing exercises are considered important aspects of any graduated shoulder rehabilitation program. Your physical therapist and treating physician will likely have a standardized protocol that they would like for you to follow.
Before beginning ... Before beginning rehab for a shoulder dislocation, you should be evaluated (minimum of exam and x-rays by a qualified physician) to rule out injuries, such as a fracture, that require early surgical intervention. If cleared, a rehab program, including scapulothoracic stabilization and balanced rotator cuff strengthening, under the guidance of a pt or atc may be safely instituted and progressed.

Related Questions

Shoulder dislocation physical therapy any tips?

Strengthening. You should really focus on strengthening your rotator cuff muscles. Make sure you do this with a physical therapist to make sure your are doing it correctly and not increasing your risk of a repeat shoulder dislocation. Read more...

How effective is physical theropy after a shoulder dislocation. I have a lebral tear and I want to play overhead sports later?

It can be effective. Assuming you had an anterior dislocation, you probably have a 50 to 80% chance of redislocation your shoulder even with rehab. So, if you have a second dislocation despite rehabilitation i would seriously consider arthroscopic labral tear repair. Read more...
Depends. Recurrent dislocation rate with bankart tear is high (85% in military cadets). Surgery is increasingly recommended to repair even after only 1 dislocation. Pt doesn't put the labrum back in the right spot and get it to heal there. It either heals to the right spot or it doesn't. If not, recurrent dislocation. Read more...

Will physical theropy repair a small lebral tear after an anterior shoulder dislocation? Because I want to play crossfit (overhead sport)

No. A labral tear will not heal on its own. Therapy can help with the pain so if you are clinically not having recurrent instability and just dealing with pain at this point i think therapy is appropriate. Any recurrent instability episode however or continued pain is going to be best managed with surgical repair. Read more...
Not repair, but help. Labral tears can be treated effectively in many, but not all shoulders with physical therapy. Therapy can strengthen the surrounding muscles to prevent recurrent dislocation and restore shoulder flexibility. Many crossfit exercises involve overhead positions that can aggravate your condition. Rehab first, then return/start crossfit with a certified xfit trainer who can help you modify wods. Read more...

Following shoulder dislocation, what is the most important activity a person should do for therapy?

Rest. There is no specific exercise that will prevent a shoulder from dislocating again. It has more to do with the bony and ligamentous structures. However, scapular stabilizer strengthening (upper back) can place your shoulder in a better position overall. Read more...
Avoid Reinjury. http://www.theshouldercenter.com/unstable-shoulder.htm for more information. After an initial short period of rest, we typically recommend a detailed evaluation for patients over 40 years of age with a shoulder specialist because the risk for rotator cuff injury is also increased now in addition to the possibility of labrum injury. Read more...

I need an advice I had a shoulder dislocation about 4 months ago and I did all my therapy then I was released to go back to work with no restrictions so I start working as before with no pain and lifting heavy stuffs up to 123 pounds.......Well sometimes

It's . It's important to communicate your concerns with your doctor before making your decision. Shoulder dislocations can be successfully treated through either therapy/home exercises or surgery depending on the specific factors associated with each case. The ultimate decision on surgery should only be made after you are comfortable with your surgeon's recommendation. How did your surgeon decide on surgery? Was it based on symptoms that you reported (i.e. You still feel your shoulder slipping out of joint)? Xray or MRI studies that were ordered? Or his exam of your shoulder in the office? Often a key factor in deciding on surgery is how problematic your shoulder feels despite good, non-surgical treatments. If your symptoms are relatively infrequent or not very limiting to your daily life, it may be reasonable to try a repeat course of therapy or perform the exercises at home on a consistent basis. If your shoulder continues to feel unstable or starts to be very limiting or more painful then surgery is a reasonable option. In the end you must be comfortable with your doctor's recommendation before proceeding with surgery. Read more...
Beware . First dislocation? If this is first dislocation at your age might be ok after rehab. Avoid rotating arm backwards. If goes out again likely needs MRI and possible surgery. It is more important the position or movements you make that determine the stability of the shoulder. Read more...

Could physical therapy for a dislocated shoulder replace surgery?

Very possible. A first time dislocation in absence of broken bone or rotator cuff tear may not require surgery especially in slightly older patient. This is much less likely to become a recurrent problem in an older patient as opposed to the high school or college aged patient. Thus physical therapy to restore motion and strength may be all that is needed. Read more...
Yes. Physical therapy can absolutely treat the problem but depends on whatever else may be wrong such as a rotator cuff tear, or a fracture. Is this a first time dislocation? What kind of work do u do? Did you have to have the shoulder put back in place in the hospital? Read more...