What do they do at physical therapy to treat a neck sprain?

Stretch/Strengthen. Most physical therapy is directed to improve range of motion and muscle function. Exercises are designed to improve posture, and decrease pain and stiffness. Injuries are often the result of limited flexibility. Physical therapy can help teach new habits, decrease inflammation, pain, and improve quality of life.
See below. Most neck sprain/strain will get better without treatment. When a few weeks go by and it not getting better, pt can be very helpful in getting someone on the right track towards healing.

Related Questions

What will they do at physical therapy for a neck sprain?

Options. Work on posture/ergonomic education, massage, joint mobilization, deep cervical flexor strengthening, shoulder rehab. Read more...
Stretching and heat/ They will do range of motion exercises and stretched as well as application of ultrasound, heat or cold as indicated. Read more...

I suffered minor neck injury on vacation from whiplash when I fell off a stand up paddle board. It made my TMJ worse. I went to ENT recently and was given mouth-guard and referral for physical therapy at kaiser. After returning from trip What led me to d

Need more info. I'm sorry, perhaps you ran out of letters before you got to the real question. Not sure what the issue is with the information here. Sorry ... please rewrite question if you wish:) Read more...
TMJ pain. i am not certain what the nature of your TMJ pain is, or exactly what your question is please restate you concern. But k ow that there are dentist that are trained to treat TMJ problems and this may be the direction for you to go. Read more...
TMJ disorder. Temporo-mandibular disorder is the second most frequent cause of orofacial pain after dental pain. In many cases due to whiplash. Earache, clicking and popping, headache and jaw pain are common symptoms. See an orofacial pain practitioner for a consultation and management of the TMJ. Read more...
Question. Your question was cut off. Please rephrase. Also, see your Dentist re: determining and treating cause of TMJ dysfunction, not just the symptoms. Read more...
Consult oral surgeon. Oral surgeon can evaluate & treat you better than ENT as oral surgeon has more experience in treating TMJ problems.The three important factors that work in co-ordination are TMJ,muscles of mastication & occlusion of teeth.Hence oral surgeons or TMJ specialists understand & treat such problems better.Sometimes they do work with ENT doctors if the case is more complex. Read more...
TMJ is muscular. Many cases of TMJ involve a muscular component and need therapy for trigger points once activated. We find that the teeth must be disengaged and the temporomandibular joint protected from pressure at the same time. A dentist needs to be involved in your care. Read more...
Incomplete question. sorry can not answer incomplete question. Good luck. Read more...
Best guessing here. I cannot see the entire question. See a Prosthodontist to evaluate your bite, joints, muscles, etc. and to adjust or remake the occlusal guard. They are the experts and can team up with other specialists if you need them. Good Luck. Read more...
Could not read ur ? sorry, but your post was cut off. I could not see what your question was. Read more...
See oral surgeon. Have the TMJ diagnosed by a dentist or oral surgeon and have them deal with the TMJ problems not the ENT. Through radiographic shots of the condyle, it will be determined if damage is done, or that a occusal guard and time is the correct treatment. Read more...
See a TMJ doc. A work-up will be done that will serve as diagnostic tool to help identify the TMJ condition. Your dentist will work with your EENT. Read more...
Further evaluation.. You may need to be evaluated by a dentist specializing in TMJ injuries and disorders to have specialized x-rays and tests of the joints. Read more...
TMJ expert. Your case is complex. Your TMJ needs to be managed by a TMJ specialist. Any dentist can be a TMJ expert with the proper training and experience. Most commonly, oral surgeons, prosthodontists, and orofacial pain specialists. Ask your MD, your dentist and your dental society for referrals. Read more...