Is plantar fasciitis common in young adults and teens?

Can be. It does not discriminate based on age. Though more common in 30's and up then teens.
Not Commonly. Before the closure of the growth plates a condition in the younger population, called calcaneal apophysitis, is more common. After the closure of the growth plates, plantar fasciitis can be seen.
Not rare. Not common, but definitely not rare. This will usually occur when a person increases there activity suddenly, such as joining the track team or jrotc. Supportive footwear, stretching and icing, and warming up before exercise can help. Stretching the plantar fascia before walking in morning can also help (roll a frozen water bottle between foot and floor.).

Related Questions

How common is both palmar and plantar fasciitis in the same patient and can it indicate more serious problems than having just one or the other?

Dupuytren's? Plantar fasciitis is extremely common.Pain in the heel when first arising in the morning is typical.' palmar ' fasciitis is different if u are referring to contracture of the palmar fascia or dupuytren's dz. If you have this "disease " than plantar 'fibromas' are not unusual and can coexist w/ dupuytren's . See an ors for evaluation and clarification of above. Best of luck! Read more...

How common is it to get bone spurs and plantar fasciitis in both feet?

Bone spurs. It is very common to have bone spurs and plantar fasciitis in both feet. Most of the time this does not require surgery. Your local podiatrist should have you up and going quickly. Stay healthy. Read more...
It is common. With the other symptom you are presenting with you should be evaluated for some systemic condition which may be causing the symptoms however. Read more...

What can I do about plantar fasciitis?

Arch supports ,shoes. Most people with common heel pain get relief of their symptoms with stretching of the calf muscles and better support of the arches. This can be with better shoes, or arch supports. Functional orthosis are the best but are expensive. I recommend trying over the counter firm supports first and if your symptoms are not better seek a podiatrist consult. Read more...
NEED FOR SUPPORT! Most shoes aren't that bad, usually it's the crummy insoles they come with! there are many possibe reasons (plantar fascitis leaps to mind) that you may have pain in the heels, but try arch supports like spenco polysorb (http://www.Spenco.Com/products/footcare/poly-sorb) and otc anti-inflammatories (like aleve). If these don't help, see a podiatrist. Read more...
A few things. Make sure your shoes have good cushion and support and are not excessively worn. If so, replace them. You might want to try over-the-counter arch supports. Doing runners stretches consistently can be a big help. You can also try over-the-counter antiinflammatories. If not improved, see a podiatrist who can offer prescribed medicine, physical therapy, injections, foot orthoses. Surgery is rare. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections, or eswt if available in your area. Read more...

What can be done about plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis. It can be managed with an "anti-inflammatory" approach by optimizing immune system function along with appropriate biomechanical control with orthotics, stretching and muscle strengthening. Read more...
Injections, Therapy. After your dagnosed, with plantar fasciits and the underlying cause via a thorough medical history, examination, and if necessary, diagnostic studies like x-rays, mri’s, or ultrasound, a treatment plan may include any orhtoitcs, steroid injection, physicla therapy, surgery or shockwave theraoy. Visit heelpainnow.Com for more informations. Read more...
Combo treatment. . If you have plantar fasciitis, and hurt most with the first few steps in the morning, the more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections. Read more...
A few things. Make sure your shoes have good cushion and support and are not excessively worn. If so, replace them. You might want to try over-the-counter arch supports. Doing runners stretches consistently can be a big help. You can also try over-the-counter antiinflammatories. If not improved, see a podiatrist who can offer prescribed medicine, physical therapy, injections, foot orthoses. Surgery is rare. Read more...

How do you get healed of plantar fasciitis?

Long term care. Plantar fasciitis didn't start overnight, nor will you be cured overnight. If you happen to get better with conservative care, you can expect the course to be about two months. If surgery is required, you need to double that number. Read more...
A few things. Make sure your shoes have good cushion and support and are not excessively worn. If so, replace them. You might want to try over-the-counter arch supports. Doing runners stretches consistently can be a big help. You can also try over-the-counter antiinflammatories. If not improved, see a podiatrist who can offer prescribed medicine, physical therapy, injections, foot orthoses. Surgery is rare. Read more...
Combo treatment. . The more you can do together, the better: #1: supportive shoes. #2: firm inserts or orthotics. #3: oral antiinflammatories (check with your doctor). #4: stretching your foot and calf. #5: icing (10 min at a time). You may also need physical therapy or cortisone injections. Read more...

Can plantar fasciitis be permanent? How likely?

Very rare . Although a very common and stubborn problem typically lasting 3 to 12 months, probably fewer than 1% of patients have "permanent" plantar fasciitis. If I can help, then join my care team and virtual practice at www.healthtap.com/dr-clarkeholmes. Read more...