How many stages of cancer are there for breast cancer?

Stages 0 through 4. There are 5 stages: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4. Stage 0 is a non invasive cancer (dcis), stage 4 is any spread outside of the breast. To determine stage, we need to know the tumor size (t), the lymph node involvement (n) and if there is metastasis (m) or spread out side of the breast. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/detection/staging.
Five. There are five including stage 0 (in situ or pre-malignant) and stages 1-4. Stage 4 is the most advanced and involves metastasis.

Related Questions

What are the rates of prostate cancer and breast cancer in the U.S.?

Cancer rates. The chance of developing an invasive breast cancer during a woman's lifetime is 1 in 8. The chance of developing prostate cancer is about 1 out of every 7 men. About 80% of men over 80 years hold have prostate cancer. Read more...

How can breast cancer occur?

NOW YOUR THE TEACHER. I want to know that answer - environmental factors-pesticides , high fat diet , radiation, food additives, prolonged estrogen exposure - early menses - late menopause or genetics brca 1/2 genetic code damage, where else in the genome/ secondary hits? Or is it combination of the above ...Call me on my cell if you got the answer. Read more...
Breast Cancer. Abnormal cells in different parts of breast usually get killed by cells we naturally have in our body--call them "killer cells"one of the theories is these cells don't do their job for some reason and the bad cancer cells keep on multiplying-killing a persons normal cells- sometimes spreading the ca cells to other parts of the body sometimes there is an inherited reason--most, we don't know. Read more...

How can breast cancer happen?

Genetics. Some genes are activated in these cells and they start growing without control. Also the could travel through blood stream to other body areas. Read more...

Can breast cancer be inherited?

Yes. As many as 10-15% of all breast cancers in the US are of the hereditary type. This has been studied quite extensively and mutations to a specific gene, called the BRCA gene, is linked to this risk. These mutations may be found with the use of a simple blood test. Read more...
Absolutely. The major genes that are talked about are brca1 and 2. The risk of cancer is high enough that carriers of the gene will elect for bilateral mastectomy before even finding cancer. If one family member is a carrier, others should be tested. It is also associated with higher rates of male cancer. Read more...
The risk can. Breast cancer itself is not passed down, but the risk for developing breast cancer can be inherited. Mutations in genes called brca1 and brca2 can be passed from a parent to a child. These inherited mutations increase the risk of developing breast cancer dramatically. A person with a brca mutation may have a 50% or higher chance of developing breast cancer, but it's not 100%. Read more...

What is systemic breast cancer?

Not sure... What you mean. Breast cancer that has spread to other sites or other organs might be described as being systemic. Would need more information to be sure that i understand your question correctly. Read more...
Huh? Do you mean breast cancer that has spread (via blood or lymph) to other locations, such as bone, lung, or liver? Do you mean "microscopic metastasis" which is the rationale for systemic chemotherapy in some cases of breast cancer (given to wipe out the microscopic cellular tumor cells before they can set up "colonies" elsewhere? Read more...
Cancer Elsewhere. What makes any cancer "evil" is the potential for cancer cells to break away & travel thru the bloodstream or lymphatics & take up residence in a different organ. Systemic disease implies that there are cancer cells "elsewhere", either indirectly identified by microscopic examination (+lymph node) or seen on x-ray studies (metastatic disease). Rx requires meds that travel "elsewhere", ie chemo-rx. Read more...