My bio mother had breast cancer at a young age, and my bio grandmother had ovarian cancer. Both passed from it. Prophylactic mastectomy an option?

Depends. If you are 18 years old, that is a very early age to be considering mastectomy surgery. It would be best to see your family doctor and get a referral to a genetic counselor for consideration of brca testing to see what your risks are. You may or may not have a higher risk of breast and/or ovarian cancers. Be checked first before considering the worst.
Genetic counseling. You should see a genetic counselor to assess your risk and to determine if genetic testing is appropriate for you.
Possibly. Brca 1 and 2 are genetic mutations that can be passed through families, and those affected have a higher than average risk of developing those kinds of cancers. Would recommend appointment with a genetic counselor and consider getting that test done. If positive, then you and your doctor can make a plan for higher intensity monitoring or prophylactic surgery.

Related Questions

Mother had breast cancer in mid fifties now I'm worried i'll get it. Nobody else in family had it. Should I get prophylactic mastectomy?

No.... Your chance of getting breast cancer, with a positive maternal history, is still only about 15%. (50% higher than a negative history.) however, if a brca test was positive, your odds would jump to about 85-86%. I would suggest a brca test if you really want to consider preemptive surgery. Speak to your primary physician and see what can be done. Good luck. Read more...

Can my grandmother develop breast cancer and ovarian cancer at the exact same time?

Rare but possible. Women with breast cancer have a 3x higher rate of ovarian cancer as compared to the general population. Furthermore, women with a brca mutation may have a 50-75% chance of developing breast cancer and a 15-45% chance of ovarian cancer. Therefore, it is possible to be diagnosed with both diseases simultaneously. Read more...
Yes. There are two ways this can happen: 1. She had breast cancer with "drop metastases", meaning spread of breast cancer to the ovaries. This can happen with breast cancers that have the estrogen receptor. 2. She had both breast and ovarian cancer at the same time, mostly likely associated with a brca mutation. With this history, you may benefit from genetic counseling and/or testing. Read more...
Yes. There are some genetic mutations that can increase the risk of both ovarian and breast cancer. If a woman has both, she should have genetic testing, beginning with the brca 1 and 2 genes. If your grandmother has that gene, there is a 50% chance her child inherited it and a 25% chance you may have inherited it. Read more...

If you were diagnosed with breast cancer, what is the chance of you getting ovarian cancer?

5% Women with a personal history of breast cancer have a 3-fold increased risk of ovarian cancer. This association is even higher in women with a brca mutation, who may have a15-45% risk of ovarian cancer. Read more...
Depends. If there is no other significant risk factors that indicate possibility of having a particular genetical abnormality i.e. Brca1 or 2 or lynch syndrome- such as- young age of cancer diagnosis or family history of ovarian, breast cancer or other cancer such as uterine/colon etc in 1 or more generation- then the risk to have ovarian cancer will be the same as the general population. Read more...
Varies. If your breast cancer was caused by a mutation in the brca gene, then your risk of ovarian cancer is greatly increased. Read more...

I'm just wondering, if you were diagnosed with breast cancer, is the chance of you getting ovarian cancer high?

Maybe. There are rare genetic syndromes that increase your chances of getting both breast and ovarian cancers (the best known are mutations in the brca genes). However, these mutations account for only about 10% of the cases of breast or ovarian cancer. Read more...
High in some groups. Individuals of european jewish descent have a much higher risk of brca 1 & 2 mutations than the general population and having relatives or family members with breast cancer or ovarian cancer especially under the age of 50 should consider genetic testing. This should be discussed with your gynecologist. Yes, men in these families can be at risk as well. Read more...

Ways to reduce my risk of developing breast cancer? (family history of breast/ovarian cancer)

Genetic testing. Probably the best way is for someone in your family get the brac/brca test to see if your family carriers the gene for breast and ovarian cancer. A low fat diet and not smoking are important for non genetic breast cancer. Regular self exams are important too. Read more...